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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Evanston in Uinta County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Bear River Watershed

 
 
Bear River Watershed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 6, 2013
1. Bear River Watershed Marker
Inscription. The Bear River Watershed spreads across 7,500 square miles of mountain and valley lands that encompass portions of Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming. Bear River is the main tributary to the Great Salt Lake and is the longest stream in the western hemisphere that does not empty into an ocean. Crossing state boundaries five times along its 500-mile path—the watershed is entirely enclosed by mountains, which form a huge basin with no drainage outlets.

Basin Geology
The Bear River Basin is part of an overthrust belt where geologic forces have thrust layers of older rock on top of younger rock. Over millions of years, a depression in the earth's surface formed, completely closed by mountains, creating the Bear River watershed.

Wildlife Habitat
The Bear River and its tributaries supply water to thousands of acres of wetlands, providing critical habitat for a wide variety of wildlife—including more than 75 species of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. Over 225 bird species have been identified in the basin area.

Valuable Resource
Since the early 1900s, the river has been harnessed for power generation and tapped for agricultural irrigation. More recently, recreation—such as hiking, camping, boating, fishing, and wildlife viewing--has become another important use of
Close-up of Image on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 6, 2013
2. Close-up of Image on Marker
the basin's resources.

Historical Times
The Shoshone, Bannock, and Ute Indians once inhabited the Bear River Basin. Fur trappers from the Hudson's Bay Company began to arrive as early as 1812. Between 1840 and 1870, more than 500,000 emigrants traveled westward through this region. Logs cut high in the Uinta Mountains were milled into ties and floated down the Bear River for construction of the Union Pacific Railroad.
 
Erected by Wyoming State Parks & Cultural Resources.
 
Location. 41° 15.887′ N, 110° 55.995′ W. Marker is in Evanston, Wyoming, in Uinta County. Marker can be reached from Bear River Drive 0.3 miles south of Interstate 80, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is located at the Bear River State Park Travel Information Center approx. 0.3 miles south of I-80 Exit 6. Marker is in this post office area: Evanston WY 82931, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wyoming's Sagebrush Sea (here, next to this marker); A Path Well-Traveled (here, next to this marker); The Wyoming State Hospital (approx. 0.9 miles away); Lincoln Highway — Sunset Cabins (approx.
Close-up of Image on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 6, 2013
3. Close-up of Image on Marker
one mile away); Evanston (approx. 1.2 miles away); First Brick Church (approx. 1.6 miles away); Uinta County Courthouse (approx. 1.7 miles away); Evanston Downtown Historic District (approx. 1.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Evanston.
 
Categories. EnvironmentNative AmericansRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers
 
Close-up of Image on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 6, 2013
4. Close-up of Image on Marker
Close-up of Image on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 6, 2013
5. Close-up of Image on Marker
Bear River State Park Markers image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 6, 2013
6. Bear River State Park Markers
Bear River State Park Travel Information Center image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, July 6, 2013
7. Bear River State Park Travel Information Center
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 276 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   6, 7. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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