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Hilton Head Island in Beaufort County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
Fort Howell - 1864
 
Fort Howell Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, March 2008
1. Fort Howell Marker
 
Inscription. An excellent example of the defensive earthworks common to the civil War era, Fort Howell was constructed by Union Forces occupying Hilton Head Island and was one of the final fortifications to be built during the war. The men of the 32nd U.S. Colored Infantry Volunteers labored to complete the fort in the fall of 1864. Its purpose to protect Mitchelville, a freedman's town of newly emancipated slaves, which lay just down the road from this spot.

Fort Howell was deeded to the Hilton Head Island Land Trust in 1993 to insure its public preservation as an historic site for current and future generations to enjoy.
 
Erected 1993 by Hilton Head Island Trust, Inc.
 
Location. 32° 14.056′ N, 80° 41.526′ W. Marker is in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, in Beaufort County. Marker is at the intersection of Beach City Road and Dillon Road, on the left when traveling north on Beach City Road. Click for map. Located near a driveway located Approx 200 feet south of Dillon Road intersection. Marker is in this post office area: Hilton Head Island SC 29926, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Howell (here, next to this marker); Mitchelville Site (within shouting distance of this marker); St. James Baptist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Port Royal (approx. 0.8 miles away); Hilton Head (approx. 0.8 miles away); Fish Hall Plantation (approx. 0.8 miles away); Thomas Fenwick Drayton (approx. 0.8 miles away); Two Gallant Gentlemen from South Carolina (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hilton Head Island.
 
Fort Howell "Traverse" Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. Fort Howell "Traverse"
You are standing on what was the fort's "Traverse," or " Bomb-Proof," a 50 foot long earthwork which protected troops inside from enemy assults on the forts entrance. Pentagonal in shape, the earthworks measured approximenately 525' by 400' and reached a height of 23'. Four 5' x 8' magazines, which were protected by earth mounds, housed powder and shot for up to 27 guns. (Lower text) The exterior of the fort featured a moat and wooden palisades - sharpened logs driven into the ground to slow advancing troops. The area directly adjacent to the fort walls was further protected by guns mounted in " bastions," an example of which at the end of this path.
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Howell, named in honor of Brigadier General Joshua B. Howell. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on April 1, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Union Regimental Histories United States Colored Troops Infantry. (Submitted on April 1, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
 
The Left ( N) moat area , as seen today Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. The Left ( N) moat area , as seen today
 
 
The North Bastion Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2008
4. The North Bastion
North Bastion Built to protect the long walls of the fort, twin bastions projected from the main earthworks and offered secure vantage points from which troops could provide covering fire. This bastion and its companion on the Southwest wall of the fort would have each housed six cannons.
 
 
Looking Northeast from the North Bastion today Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, March 2008
5. Looking Northeast from the North Bastion today
 
 
Enemy's view of the North Bastion locale Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2008
6. Enemy's view of the North Bastion locale
 
 
Left (S) moat area as seen today Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, 2008
7. Left (S) moat area as seen today
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on April 1, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 4,124 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on April 1, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
 
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