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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tulsa in Tulsa County, Oklahoma — The American South (West South Central)
 

Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial

 
 
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Fire image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
1. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Fire
Inscription.

Fire is a revered element of many sacred rituals of the Mvskoke (Muscogee Creek People). The sacred fire represents the divine masculine of the "Epofvnkv" (the Creator) to which all things are connected.

The sacred fires were integral to the religious, political and social systems long before the first European contact. The ashes of our ceremonial fires from each of the tribal towns were carried over the long march to be rekindled here.

The sacred fires are built with logs pointing to the east, west, north and south; the four cardinal directions. This is the basis of many traditional Mvskoke concepts. The earliest Mvskoke teachings instruct that our sacred fires are to burn eternally. If extinguished, the Mvskoke will perish.

During the rituals, dances and prayers, the smoke rises from the sacred fires and it fades into the skies. The smoke carries the messages of the Mvskoke people to the Creator. These ceremonies are not primarily for personal benefit, but rather the benefit of the entire community or nation.

By 1834, our forefathers were forced to walk to the Indian Territory (Oklahoma) on what is known today as the Trail of Tears from our ancestral tribal lands in the southeastern United States. However, our Mvskoke leaders ensured that our traditional legacy was continued and protected
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
2. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker
here.

Assimilation into the dominant society, U.S. Government policies, and the loss of elders knowing the old ways contributed to the extinction of many tribal towns. Of the 44 original tribal towns removed, only a few Mvskoke and Euchee tribal grounds actively continue with ancient ceremonies. These remaining ceremonial grounds keep our sacred fires "alive" to this day.

Each year at Council Oak we celebrate the historic meeting held here after the United States Government removal, to re-establish our tribal government. We remember the struggles and celebrate the successes of our Nation. We honor those tribal towns and all Mvskoke men and women who perpetuate the traditional ways and keep the ceremonial fires burning.

The traditions of the ceremonial grounds by Mvskoke men and women will insure that the next generations will know our ancient customs and lifestyles. Our language, traditions and culture have survived many destructive events. However, the Mvskoke have many reasons to celebrate.
 
Erected by Muskogee (Creek) Nation.
 
Location. 36° 8.179′ N, 95° 59.391′ W. Marker is in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in Tulsa County. Marker is at the intersection of 18th Street and Cheyenne Avenue, on the right when traveling west on 18th Street
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
3. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker
. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1750 South Cheyenne Avenue, Tulsa OK 74119, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Creek Stickball Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Mary Veasey Leech (within shouting distance of this marker); Not Just a Ball Game (within shouting distance of this marker); Elliott Building (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Bridge that Saved Tulsa (approx. 0.9 miles away); First Presbyterian Church Centennial (approx. 0.9 miles away); Oklahoma Natural Gas Company Building (approx. one mile away); Pentane (C5H12) Molecular Model (approx. one mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Tulsa.
 
Also see . . .
1. Creek Nation Tree Site. (Submitted on August 23, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Muscogee (Creek) Nation. (Submitted on August 23, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. AnthropologyEducationNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
4. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
5. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
6. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
7. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
8. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
9. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial Marker
Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
10. Creek Nation Council Oak Memorial
Creek Nation Council Oak Park Sign image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
11. Creek Nation Council Oak Park Sign
Creek Nation Council Oak image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
12. Creek Nation Council Oak
Post Oak
Creek Nation Council Oak image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 21, 2013
13. Creek Nation Council Oak
Post Oak
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 409 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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