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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hyattsville in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Hyattsville National Historic District

City of Hyattsville

 
 
The Hyattsville National Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
1. The Hyattsville National Historic District Marker
Inscription. Established in 1982 and expanded in 2004, over 1,000 structures encircling the Victorian core of Hyattsville were listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Homes built in the late 1800s located near the intersection of 42nd Avenue and Gallatin Street are some of the oldest properties still standing. The homes of Hyattsville's early founders and developers had already been lost to renewal efforts along the Route One corridor.

The success of the National Register nomination, begun by local citizens interested in preservation, led to forming of a preservation association, which remains active, and presents an annual Historic House Tour each May.

Twelve homes within the district are also designated historic sites under Prince Georges County Historic Sites and Districts Plan. As a group these homes represent a wide variety of architectural styles, including Stick (4110 Gallatin), Shingle (5011 42nd Avenue), Late Victorian Queen Anne (4100 Crittenden Street) and Italianate (5104 42nd Avenue). A pattern book home design available through a catalog distributed by R.W. Shoppell is among the properties designated as historic sites. (4106 Gallatin Street). Beginning in the 1920s, bungalows and craftsman style cottage house kits could also be purchased by mail from companies such as Sears and Roebuck.

Historic
The Hyattsville National Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
2. The Hyattsville National Historic District Marker
Hyattsville welcomes you to walk our tree-lined streets, take a rest in this park (once the site of the Spencer Street school), and enjoy -- but remember these are private homes.


(Side Bar)

A number of different developers worked in Hyattsville from 1880 to the 1930s, and evidence of their work remains extant in such areas as the 4100 block of Emerson Street (known as the Checkerboard Block). These modest homes with their fairly large lots and welcoming porches, were one of the reasons Hyattsville was recognized early on as a Good Place to Live and Work.
 
Location. 38° 57.156′ N, 76° 56.627′ W. Marker is in Hyattsville, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Gallatin Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. The marker is on the east edge of Robert J. King Park and the Mount Hermon Masonic Temple. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4200 Gallatin Street, Hyattsville MD 20781, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Route One, Our Hometown Main Street (approx. 0.2 miles away); The City of Hyattsville (approx. 0.2 miles away); Edmonston Veterans Park (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); The Remarkable Plummer Family
Hyatt's Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
3. Hyatt's Mansion
Christopher Clarke Hyatt's Mansion (1878), on present day Baltimore Avenue/Route One. This house was razed n the mid 20th century.
Close-up of photo on marker
(approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Adam F. Plummer (approx. half a mile away); Riversdale (approx. 0.7 miles away); Indian Queen Tavern (approx. 0.8 miles away); George Washington House (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hyattsville.
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
Fox's Barn image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
4. Fox's Barn
Fox's Barn (1892), 5011 42nd Avenue, a classic example of the Shingle Style; Prince Georges County Designated Site.
Close-up of photo on marker
Harriet Ralston House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
5. Harriet Ralston House
The Harriet Ralston House (1880s), 4206 Decatur Street; a Prince George's County Designated Site, 3-story front-gables frame retreat cottage.
Frederic Augustus Holden House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
6. Frederic Augustus Holden House
4110 Gallatin Street, built in 1883 by Frederick A. Holden; Carpenter Gothic Design; Prince Georges County Designated Site.
The Checkerboard Block image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
7. The Checkerboard Block
4100 Block of Emerson Street (1930s) -- the "Checkerboard Block".
Fox's Barn<br>5011 42nd Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
8. Fox's Barn
5011 42nd Street
The Harriet Ralston House<br>4206 Decatur Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
9. The Harriet Ralston House
4206 Decatur Street
Frederick A. Holden House<br>4110 Gallatin Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
10. Frederick A. Holden House
4110 Gallatin Street
4104 Emerson Street<br>One of the two styles of house<br>on the Checkerboard Block image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
11. 4104 Emerson Street
One of the two styles of house
on the Checkerboard Block
4110 Emerson Street<br>One of the two styles of house<br> on the Checkerboard Block image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
12. 4110 Emerson Street
One of the two styles of house
on the Checkerboard Block
Mount Hermon Lodge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
13. Mount Hermon Lodge
Mt Hermon Lodge Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 25, 2013
14. Mt Hermon Lodge Cornerstone
Mt Hermon Lodge
No. 179
A.F. And A.M.
May 3, 1893
Rededicated
May 1, 1993
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 280 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   14. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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