Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Ulm in Brown County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Forster Building

1861

 

—Historic Downtown New Ulm —

 
Forster Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 20, 2013
1. Forster Building Marker
Inscription.
Frederick Forster came to the United States in 1850 and taught school in New York. He moved to New Ulm in 1858, where he continued teaching, becoming the city's postmaster in 1861.

In 1860, Forster purchased this lot and the following year, with his partner, Friedrich Gommel, a Cincinnati potter, opened New Ulm's first pottery, selling "all sorts of fine and ordinary dishes."

During the Dakota Conflict, this building, located just outside the barricades, became an important defense outpost. On August 23, 1862, Henry Swift, a future Governor of Minnesota, and about twenty men were assigned to defend this structure. Charles Flandrau wrote, "A number of our men took possession of the brick Post Office . . . and loopholed it in all stories and through the roof, thus protecting quite a range of the rear of the town." After the Dakota withdrew, the town was evacuated. Upon his return, Forster wrote that he "found all the buildings that hadn't been burned had all been broken into, with chests and crates opened and their contents stolen." The pottery closed shortly after the Civil War. Gommel served several terms as New Ulm's constable while Forster returned to his work as postmaster and teacher.

It remained a private home until 1925 when A. J. Stoltenberg bought the property to expand his Broadway
Nearby Frederick Forster Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 20, 2013
2. Nearby Frederick Forster Building Marker
Frederick Forster, who conducted the New Ulm Pottery here with Frances Gommel, was also the Postmaster. This building, used as a combined pottery works, Post Office and dwelling, was a very important defense outpost in 1862.
During the Second Battle of New Ulm, Henry Swift, future Governor of Minnesota, and about twenty men were assigned to defend this structure.
"A number of our men took possession of the brick Post Office...and loopholed it in all stories and through the roof, thus protecting quite a range of the rear of the town," wrote Colonel Flandrau.
Even though the building was outside the barricaded area, the defenders were able to repulse all Indian advances and retained possession to the end of the fight.
This is one of the few buildings remaining from the time of the Uprising. The exterior walls have been covered with stucco, but the building remains essentially unchanged.
Abel's Electric Motor Shop • Irvin C. Abel, Fay B. Abel and Brown County Historical Society
Tire Company. This is one of few buildings in the city dating from the time of the Dakota Conflict.
 
Location. 44° 18.847′ N, 94° 27.726′ W. Marker is in New Ulm, Minnesota, in Brown County. Marker is on North Broadway (State Highway 15 / 68) south of 2nd North Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 117 North Broadway, New Ulm MN 56073, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. New Ulm (within shouting distance of this marker); Jacob Nix Platz (within shouting distance of this marker); Arbeiter Hall (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Two Battles of New Ulm (about 300 feet away); Somsen Hitching Post (about 400 feet away); Dacotah House (about 500 feet away); Crone Store (about 500 feet away); Erd Building (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in New Ulm.
 
More about this marker.
photo caption: Forster Building
Images from the Brown County Historical Society
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesWars, US Indian
 
Forster Building Markers image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 20, 2013
3. Forster Building Markers
located on both sides of the door
Forster Building image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 20, 2013
4. Forster Building
The oldest commercial building in the city; the exterior walls have been covered with stucco, but the building remains essentially unchanged.
Forster Building Plaque image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, June 20, 2013
5. Forster Building Plaque
This building was one of the out-posts during the Indian massacre.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 357 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement