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Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria
 

The Court or Franciscan Church

Hof- bzw. Franziskanerkirche

 
 
Court or Franciscan Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 15, 2013
1. Court or Franciscan Church Marker
Inscription.
Hof- bzw. Franziskanerkirche
Die Innsbrucker Hofkirche (1553/63) beherbergt das bedeutendste Kaisergrab des Abendlandes. Das Grabmal wurde zum Gedenken an Kaiser Maximilian I. (1459 – 1519) errichtet. Die bedeutendsten Künstler der Zeit wie etwa Albrecht Dürer, Peter Vischer d. Ä., Alexander Colin waren daran beteiligt.
Berühmt sind vor allem die 28 überlebensgrossen Bronzefiguren, die im Volksmund “Schwarzmander” genannt werden. Sie stellen die tatsächlichen wie auch die sagenhaften Vorfahren Kaiser Maximilians I. dar und sollen so den Anspruch des Hauses Habsburg auf die Kaiserwürde unterstreichen. Das Grabmal selbst ist leer. Kaiser Maximilian I. ist in Wiener Neustadt begraben. Auch der berühmte Tiroler Freiheitskämpfer Andreas Hofer fand in der Hofkirche seine letzte Ruhestätte. In der Kirche befindet sich die 1561 fertig gestellte Ebert-Orgel, die zu den ältesten funktionstüchtigen Orgeln der Welt zählt. Bemerkenswert ist der für Erzherzog Ferdinand II. gefertigte Fürstenchor.

German-English translation:

Innsbruck's Hofkirche (1553-63) hosts the most significant imperial tomb of the West (i.e the Holy Roman Empire). The tomb was built in commemoration of Emperor Maximilian I (1459 - 1519). The most important artists of the time were involved, such as Albrecht
The Court or Franciscan Church Marker - North Side of Church from Burggraben/Rennweg image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, July 15, 2013
2. The Court or Franciscan Church Marker - North Side of Church from Burggraben/Rennweg
Dürer, Peter Vischer the Elder, and Colin Alexander.
Of particular fame are the 28 larger-than-life bronze sculptures, popularly called the "Black Men". They represent the actual and mythical ancestors of Emperor Maximilian I and are intended to emphasize the claim of the House of Habsburg to the imperial throne. The tomb itself is empty. Emperor Maximilian I is buried in the Wiener Neustadt. The famous Tyrolean freedom fighter Andreas Hofer, however, found his final resting place here in the Hofkirche. The Ebert organ, installed in the church in 1561, can be counted amongst the oldest functioning organs in the world. Also noteworthy is the princely chapel constructed for the Archduke Ferdinand II.

 
Erected by Stadt Innsbruck (City of Innsbruck).
 
Location. 47° 16.113′ N, 11° 23.716′ E. Marker is in Innsbruck, Tyrol. Marker is at the intersection of Rennweg and Universitätsstraße on Rennweg. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Innsbruck, Tyrol 6020, Austria.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Tower of the Coat of Arms (a few steps from this marker); The New Seminary (within shouting distance of this marker); The Old University (within shouting distance
Interior of Court Church image. Click for full size.
By Verlag Fritz Gratl, circa 1910
3. Interior of Court Church
Here the tomb of Maximilian I (who is actually buried in Wiener Neustadt) is visible in the center, with the Schwarzmander (Black Men) lined up along each side of the nave.
of this marker); The House of Archduke Sigismund of Tyrol (within shouting distance of this marker); The Teutonic Order House (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line); Precht House (about 120 meters away); The Old City Hall / City Tower (about 150 meters away); Bederlunger House (about 150 meters away). Click for a list of all markers in Innsbruck.
 
More about this marker. The church is at the intersection of Rennweg, Universitätsstraße, Hofgasse and Burgraben.
 
Also see . . .  The Court Church, Innsbruck. Tyrol.tl's describes the Court Church (in English). On the "Black Men": ...The 40 larger than life-sized statues have, however, never been completed and only 28 were finally brought into being. These “Black Men” (Schwarze Mander) flank the grave-site and give the church the by-name “Black Men church”. Nevertheless the expression is not completely correct, as the bronze statues also comprise women. Among the statues, there are some members of the family of the emperor Maximilian (e.g. his two wives Maria von Burgund
Closeup of the <i>Schwarzemander </i> (Black Men) image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1870
4. Closeup of the Schwarzemander (Black Men)
Image courtesy of the US Library of Congress.
and Bianca Maria Sforza), representatives of Christianity (such as the crusader Gottfried von Bouillon) as well as aristocrats of other courts of Europe, in order to put the emperor’s claims forward. Today the Court Church is the most significant monument of Tyrol and the most striking emperor’s grave-site of Europe.
(Submitted on September 8, 2013.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicChurches, Etc.
 
Closeup of Bas-relief on the Tomb of Maximilian image. Click for full size.
By S. Steiner, circa 1870
5. Closeup of Bas-relief on the Tomb of Maximilian
One of 24 reliefs surrounding Maximilian's tomb, this depicts the marriage of Maximilian to his wife, Maria of Burgundy. (Image courtesy of the US Library of Congress.)
South Side of the Court Church (looking north on Burggraben). image. Click for full size.
By Verlag Leo Stainer, Innsbruck, circa 1920
6. South Side of the Court Church (looking north on Burggraben).
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 408 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on . • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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