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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mystic in New London County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Whaleship Charles W. Morgan

 
 
Whaleship Charles W. Morgan Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2013
1. Whaleship Charles W. Morgan Marker
Inscription.
Whaleship
Charles W. Morgan
Built: 1841
Hillman Bros. Shipyard
New Bedford, Martin
Length: 105’ 6”
Beam: 27’ 7”
Depth: 17’ 6”
As the last surviving American wooden whaleship, and the oldest American merchant ship afloat, the Charles W. Morgan is unique today. When she was launched in 1841, the Morgan was one of more than 600 American whaleships that hunted whales to supply the world’s need for oil for lubrication and illumination. Named for her original owner, wahing merchant Charles W. Morgan of new Bedford, Massachusetts, the vessel made 37 voyages during an 80-year career.
Hunting primarily in the Pacific Ocean, the Morgan often spent three to five years finding the fifty of more whales needed to fill her hold with barrels of oil. To shorten voyages, the Morgan was berthed at San Francisco from 1887 to 1904. A crew of 30 to 36 men was needed to row the six-man whaleboats used to hunt and capture whales, and then to render oil from the blubber in a brick tryworks on deck. These crews were among the most diverse at sea, mixing Americans, Europeans, West Indians, Azoreans, Cape Verdeans, Polynesians, and Asians. They received a small share of the profits for their years of tedium and toil.
After her retirement in1921, the Morgan was preserved as an exhibit
Whaleship Charles W. Morgan docked in Boston's Navy Yard Charlestown,Ma image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, July 21, 2014
2. Whaleship Charles W. Morgan docked in Boston's Navy Yard Charlestown,Ma
the 38th Voyage of Charles W Morgan May 17- August 6, 2014 On July 21, 2014 toured the Whaling Ship Charles W Morgan
near New Bedford before coming to Mystic Seaport in 1941. She was named a National Historic Landmark in 1967 and since 1973 has been exhibited afloat here, restored to look much as she did around 1905.
ID# 1941.761
 
Erected by Mystic Seaport.
 
Location. 41° 21.522′ N, 71° 57.928′ W. Marker is in Mystic, Connecticut, in New London County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Greenmanville Avenue (Connecticut Route 27) and Bruggeman Place, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located in Mystic Seaport. Marker is at or near this postal address: 75 Greenmanville Avenue, Mystic CT 06355, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hays & Ros Clark Shiplift (a few steps from this marker); Lathrop D-90 Diesel Engine (within shouting distance of this marker); Wichmann Semi-Diesel Engine (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Compound Steam Engine (about 300 feet away); Live Oak Log (about 400 feet away); Propeller Steamer Sabino (about 600 feet away); Eastern-Rig Dragger Roann (about 700 feet away); Harbor Tugboat Kingston II (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Mystic.
 
Regarding Whaleship Charles W. Morgan. Charles W. Morgan is the
Whaleship Charles W. Morgan being repaired Sept 2012 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 19, 2012
3. Whaleship Charles W. Morgan being repaired Sept 2012
world's oldest surviving merchant vessel. She was listed on the National Register of Historic Places 1966
 
Also see . . .
1. Mystic Seaport, The Museum of America and the Sea. (Submitted on September 8, 2013, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Charles W. Morgan (ship) on Wikipedia. (Submitted on September 8, 2013, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
3. Video: Charles W. Morgan – Restored to Greatness. Two minute video on the MysticSeaport.org website. (Submitted on May 15, 2014.) 

4. The 38th Voyage. May 17 – August 6, 2014 Over an 80-year career, the 1841 whaleship Charles W. Morgan sailed on 37 voyages to remote corners of the globe. In May of 2014, following a five-year, multi-million dollar restoration, the ship set out on her 38th Voyage — perhaps her most important — to raise awareness of America’s maritime heritage and to call attention to issues of ocean sustainability and conservation. It was the first time the National Historic Landmark had left Mystic Seaport since her arrival in 1941. (Submitted on February 16, 2015, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
Whaleship Charles W. Morgan being repaired Sept 2012 image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 19, 2012
4. Whaleship Charles W. Morgan being repaired Sept 2012
Whaleship Charles W. Morgan image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2013
5. Whaleship Charles W. Morgan
The ship is afloat, undergoing restoration. Her masts and rigging have yet to be erected. Restoration is due to be completed by summer of 2014.
Plaque On Board Ship image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2013
6. Plaque On Board Ship
Charles W. Morgan
has been designated a
Registered National Historic Landmark
Under the Provision of the
Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935
This Site Possesses Exceptional Value
In Commemorating or Illustrating
The History of the United States
U.S. Department of the Interior
National Park Service
1966
Aboard the Whaleship Charles W. Morgan image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2013
7. Aboard the Whaleship Charles W. Morgan
The copper-lined brick tryworks on the maindeck. Whale blubber was rendered over a fire to extract oil.
Aboard the Whaleship Charles W. Morgan image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2013
8. Aboard the Whaleship Charles W. Morgan
Restoration workers gather to show their crafts and sing sea-songs for visitors at the end of the work day.
The H.B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, Mystic Seaport image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2013
9. The H.B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, Mystic Seaport
The workshop where much of the restoration woodwork takes place. image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, August 26, 2013
10. The workshop where much of the restoration woodwork takes place.
Charles W. Morgan under sail in 1920 image. Click for full size.
© Mystic Seaport
11. Charles W. Morgan under sail in 1920
Charles W. Morgan arrives at Mystic, 1941 image. Click for full size.
© Mystic Seaport
12. Charles W. Morgan arrives at Mystic, 1941
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 512 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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