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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Marcos in Hays County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

San Marcos Springs

 
 
San Marcos Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 21, 2013
1. San Marcos Springs Marker
Inscription. Pouring forth millions of gallons of clear, icy water daily, these springs feed the San Marcos River and the 1,380-square-mile area which it drains. The immense springs rise at the Balcones Escarpment, a geologic fault line which slices across the state, separating upland from lowland Texas.

The abundance of fresh water made these springs a mecca for the Indians who inhabited Central Texas and later for the European explorers and settlers who followed. The name San Marcos was first given to a Texas river by the Alonso de Leon Expedition on April 26, 1689 (Saint Mark's Day). The name was not applied to the present river, however, until 1709. Other explorers inspected this area and in 1755 it became a temporary site for several Spanish missions.

Almost a century later, in 1845, pioneers William W. Moon and Mike Sessom made a permanent settlement here. In 1851 Gen. Edward Burleson, William Lindsey, and Eli T. Merriman bought the adjacent land and on it laid out the town of San Marcos.

Attracted by the scenic beauty of the area, A. B. Rogers started a park here in 1926. Over the years it has been developed into “Aquarena Springs”, one of Central Texas' most popular tourist attractions.
 
Erected 1971 by Texas State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker
San Marcos Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 21, 2013
2. San Marcos Springs Marker
In the background, Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, Texas State University
Number 10325.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 29° 53.637′ N, 97° 55.739′ W. Marker is in San Marcos, Texas, in Hays County. Marker is at the intersection of Spring Lake and West Laurel Street, on the right when traveling west on Spring Lake. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 951 Aquarena Springs Drive, San Marcos TX 78666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Post San Marcos (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Calaboose (approx. 1.3 miles away); Site of Coronal Institute (approx. 1.3 miles away); Wonder Cave (approx. 2 miles away); McGehee Crossing (approx. 2.5 miles away but has been reported missing); Col. Ignacio Elizondo’s 1813 Campaign (approx. 3 miles away); Site of the First Town of San Marcos (approx. 3.2 miles away); Don Felipe Roque de la Portilla (approx. 3.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Marcos.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, Texas State University. (Submitted on September 22, 2013, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
2. Historical Overview of San Marcos Springs.
Spring Lake image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 21, 2013
3. Spring Lake
In 1849 a dam was built across the San Marcos River to operate a gristmill. The dam created Spring Lake, pictured here. Spring Lake is closed to the public for swimming except on very rare occasions, The Rotary Club of Greater San Marcos' Aquarena Springs TRI (triathlon) being one such exception. Shown is the swimming portion of the 2nd annual triathlon, 9/21/2013.
Overview of the springs, including a video, starting from earliest times (many archaeologists believe San Marcos Springs to be one of the oldest continually inhabited sites in North America) to the present. The "River Center" referenced on this site was renamed The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment (Submitted on September 22, 2013, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

3. National Geographic video on archaeological research at Spring Lake. Researchers are exploring freshwater springs in Texas that date back to the end of the last ice age. Spring Lake, near San Marcos, Texas, is unique because it was dammed 150 years ago, creating an underwater archaeological preserve. (Submitted on September 22, 2013, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Sacred Springs Powwow image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, October 5, 2013
4. Sacred Springs Powwow
San Marcos Springs continues to be recognized by Native Americans as a special space, important to their history. San Marcos Springs is home to the Sacred Springs Powwow, sponsored by the Indigenous Cultures Institute of San Marcos, Texas. Photo is from the 2013 Powwow.
Display on Archaeology of the Springs image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, October 5, 2013
5. Display on Archaeology of the Springs
Photo is high resolution. Click on photo to read.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 471 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   4, 5. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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