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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Marina in Monterey County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Training to Defend America

Fort Ord Dunes State Park

 
 
Training to Defend America Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 15, 2013
1. Training to Defend America Marker
Captions: After weeks of practice on the dunes rifle ranges, a soldier tests for his Weapon Qualification Badge. (bottom left); A red flag flying at a rifle range served as a warning that live firing was underway. (bottom center).
Inscription. From World War II until Fort Ordís closure in 1994, there dunes echoed with the sound of small arms fire. Rifle and machine gun ranges here gave thousands of U.S. Army Infantrymen the marksmanship skills needed to serve their nation in times of both war and peace. Fort Ordís varied topography, from ocean beaches to forested hills, made it an ideal basic training center for infantry mission throughout the world.
 
Erected by California State Parks.
 
Location. 36° 39.619′ N, 121° 49.286′ W. Marker is in Marina, California, in Monterey County. Marker can be reached from 8th Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Marina CA 93933, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Former Firing Range Becomes a State Park (a few steps from this marker); Welcome to Fort Ord Dunes State Park! (a few steps from this marker); Stilwell Hall: A Fond Memory (within shouting distance of this marker); A Coastal Attack the Army Couldnít Stop (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Portola-Crespi Monument (approx. 4.1 miles away);
Training to Defend America Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 15, 2013
2. Training to Defend America Marker
Depots (approx. 5.1 miles away); Fish Hoppers (approx. 5.3 miles away); Silver Harvest (approx. 5.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Marina.
 
More about this marker. The marker is located in Fort Ord Dunes State Park near the old Stilwell Hall parking lot.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Ord. The post was named after Major General Edward Cresap Ord. General Ordís fame in the history books includes some information on being an Indian fighter. In 1847 He was a lieutenant with Maj Gen J C Fremontís Army when the present site of the nearby Presidio of Monterey was brought into existence. But His actions as a Civil War commander established His military career. He distinguished himself during the Civil War in the Battle of Iuke, Mississippi operations against Petersburg, Virginia and the capture of Fort Harrison, Virginia. General Ord is buried at the Arlington National Cemetery. (Submitted on September 29, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Historic California Posts: Fort Ord. The California Military Museum's history of Fort Ord. On the fort's establishment:...Fort Ord was established
Former Firing Range image. Click for full size.
October 18, 2007
3. Former Firing Range
in 1917, originally as Camp Gigling, as a military training base for infantry troops. In 1917, the US Army bought the present day East Garrison and nearby lands on the east side of Fort Ord to use as a maneuver and training ground for field artillery and cavalry troops stationed at the Presidio of Monterey. Before the Army's use of the property, the area was agricultural, as is much of the surrounding land today. No permanent improvements were made until the late 1930s, when administrative buildings, barracks, mess halls, tent pads, and a sewage treatment plant were constructed.
(Submitted on September 30, 2013.) 
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 309 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   3. submitted on . • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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