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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Jose in Santa Clara County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

San Jose High School

150 Years

 
 
San Jose High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2013
1. San Jose High School Marker
Inscription. Founded in 1863 during the Presidency of Abraham Lincoln, SJHS is the oldeest high school in Santa Clara County and second oldest in California. Its first classes were held in a 2nd floor room of J.G. Orbonís flour store, where Joseph Bowen, the founder and first teacher and principal taught classes. On January 1, 1868, SJHS was located on Santa Clara Street, where the first diplomas were awarded to high school students. In 1898, a new high school building was ready on Washington Square and declared at the time one of the finest high schools in California. On April 18, 1906, the building was destroyed by the San Francisco earthquake. After the earthquake of 1906, classes were held for two years in the Lincoln school building. On September 9, 1908, a new SJHS was dedicated on San Fernando Street, but with the growth of higher education in the early 1950s, SJHS was forced to relocate once again. The site is now San Jose State University. Since November 2, 1952, SJHS has been at this current location.

Graduates include leaders in education, athletics, the arts, business, philanthropy, and public service. These include three United States Congressmen, a San Jose Mayor and Cabinet member. As an International Baccalaureate World School, it continues to provide leadership models.
 
Erected
San Jose High School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 17, 2013
2. San Jose High School Marker
2013 by San Jose High Class of 1972, Native Sons of the Golden West & Mountain Charlie Chapter No. 1850, E Clampus Vitus.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus, and the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 37° 21.004′ N, 121° 52.273′ W. Marker is in San Jose, California, in Santa Clara County. Marker is at the intersection of North 24th Street and East Julian Street, on the right when traveling south on North 24th Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 273 North 24th Street, San Jose CA 95116, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Amamiyla Midwife House (approx. 1.2 miles away); Sumo Ring Site (approx. 1.2 miles away); Asahi Baseball (approx. 1.2 miles away); Tower Bell (approx. 1.2 miles away); Japantown Theater (approx. 1.2 miles away); Takalkni Printing (approx. 1.2 miles away); First Normal School (approx. 1.2 miles away); Old Japantown Garage (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Jose.
 
Also see . . .  San Jose High School History - San Jose High School Bulldog Foundation. From 1952 to the present, SJHS has been located at 24th and Julian. The original school subsequent to renovations
San Jose High School image. Click for full size.
By Richard Bebrent, Publisher, circa 1905
3. San Jose High School
in later years cost over $2,500,000. In 1952, the original building was selected by the Museum of Modern Art in NYC as one of the forty-three outstanding buildings of the postwar period.
(Submitted on September 30, 2013, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Education
 
San Jose High School destroyed by the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake image. Click for full size.
By N/a, circa 1906
4. San Jose High School destroyed by the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 392 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   3. submitted on .   4. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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