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Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle of Germantown

The Revolution in the Wissahickon

 

—1777 —

 
Battle of Germantown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 5, 2013
1. Battle of Germantown Marker
Inscription.
To retake recently occupied Philadelphia, American Commander-in-Chief, General George Washington, ordered a surprise four-prong attack on the British forces encamped in Germantown. Assigned the defense of the Wissahickon Valley, German mercenary troops, collectively called Hessians, erected two miles of fortifications. Washington’s orders for the Wissahickon attack were to “get upon the Enemy’s left and Rear” while “every Officer and Soldier to have a piece of White paper in their Hatt” for identification. According to General Armstrong, for three hours the two combatant forces continually “cannonaded from the heights on each side of the Wissihickon, whilst the Riflemen on opposite sides acted on lower ground” until the American troops retreated in an orderly fashion.

The American assault within the Wissahickon consisted of primarily Pennsylvania Militia commanded by their State General John Armstrong. He reported, “I thought we had a Victory, but to my great disappointment, soon found our army were gone an hour or two before, & we the last on the ground.”
 
Location. 40° 1.765′ N, 75° 11.462′ W. Marker is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia County. Marker can be reached
Battle of Germantown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 5, 2013
2. Battle of Germantown Marker
from Rittenhousetown Lane, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is accessible from the parking area for Rittenhouse Town off Lincoln Drive. Marker is in this post office area: Philadelphia PA 19144, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Jacob Rittenhouse Home at RittenhouseTown (a few steps from this marker); Rittenhouse Town (within shouting distance of this marker); David Rittenhouse (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rittenhouse Homestead (about 400 feet away); Colonial Herb Garden (about 400 feet away); Rittenhousetown Historic District (about 500 feet away); Forbidden Drive (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ten Box Shelter (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Philadelphia.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker contains a Sketch of the Surprise of Germantown by the American Forces Commanded by General Washington October 4th 1777. Map Illustration: Courtesy of Historic Rittenhouse Town Collection.
A portrait at the bottom of the marker shows “Lieutenant Colonel Robert Knox of Philadelphia in a Pennsylvania Militia Officer’s uniform typical of those worn during the Battle of Germantown.” Painting by Charles Wilson Peale: Courtesy of the Fort Ticonderoga Museum.
Next to this is a picture of the
Marker on the Wissahickon Valley Park Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 5, 2013
3. Marker on the Wissahickon Valley Park Trail
battle with the caption “Fighting within the village of Germantown concentrated on the Chew Family Home of Cliveden.” Painting of Cliveden Courtesy of Cliveden, a National Trust Historic Site.
 
Also see . . .
1. American Revolution: Battle of Germantown. (Submitted on October 5, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. The Battle of Germantown 1777. Account of the battle from a British perspective from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on October 5, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Battle of Germantown image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 5, 2013
4. Battle of Germantown
American forces attack British troops at Cliveden during the Battle of Germantown reenactment. The British can be seen firing and the Americans from the second floor windows.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 398 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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