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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Montevideo in Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Camp Release State Monument

 
 
Camp Release State Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
1. Camp Release State Monument
southern side
Inscription.
Southern side:
Camp Release

Eastern side:
Battles
Redwood Aug. 18, 1862.
Fort Ridgely Aug. 20.-22.
New Ulm Aug. 23.-24.
Birch Coulee Sept. 2.
Fort Abercrombie Sept. 6.
Wood Lake Sept. 23.

Northern side:
To Commemorate the surrender here of a large body of Indians, and the release of 269 captives mostly women and children September 26, 1862. The result mainly of the signal victory over the hostile Sioux at Wood Lake by Minnesota troops under command of General Henry H. Sibley all being incidents of the Great Sioux Indian Massacre.

Western side:
Erected in 1894 by the State of Minnesota in accordance with an act of the Legislature approved April 11, 1893 and under supervision of the committee therein named.
C. C. Andrews H. E. Hoard W. H. Grant Wm. M. Mills A. H. Reed - Committee
 
Erected 1894 by the State of Minnesota. (Marker Number 6.)
 
Location. 44° 55.991′ N, 95° 44.875′ W. Marker is near Montevideo, Minnesota, in Lac qui Parle County. Marker can be reached from 445th Avenue south of U.S. 212, on the right when traveling south
Camp Release State Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
2. Camp Release State Monument
eastern side
. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Montevideo MN 56265, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Release (a few steps from this marker); Tried and Sentenced (within shouting distance of this marker); Captives Released (within shouting distance of this marker); Maza sa Protected His Village (within shouting distance of this marker); School Bell (approx. 13.3 miles away); Henry Hill 1829-1879 (approx. 13.3 miles away); Ancient Exposed Rocks (approx. 13.4 miles away); World's Oldest Rock (approx. 13.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Montevideo.
 
More about this marker. This monument was the sixth of 23 state monuments that were erected by the Minnesota legislature between 1873 and 1929. These monuments represent Minnesota's first public efforts to mark historic sites.
 
Regarding Camp Release State Monument. In 1862, the Minnesota Dakota, also known by the French term, “Sioux," waged war against the United States following two years of unfulfilled treaty obligations. After attacking the Redwood (Lower Sioux) Agency on August 18, the Dakota moved toward New Ulm. The U.S.-Dakota War in the Minnesota River Valley claimed
Camp Release State Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
3. Camp Release State Monument
northern side
the lives of at least 450 whites and an unknown number of Dakota before it came to an end at Camp Release on September 26, 1862.
 
Also see . . .
1. Minnesota Department of Transportation. Historic Roadside Development Structures Inventory. "Camp Release State Memorial Wayside, established in 1889, is the oldest wayside rest on the Mn/DOT trunk highway system... In 1862, the site of Camp Release was the site of the Wahpeton Dakota village led by Red Iron. Red Iron did not participate in the U.S. Government-Dakota Conflict of 1862 and so his village became the site where 269 settlers, who had been captured by the Dakota, were brought by Native American "friendlies." Other leaders in charge at the camp were Chief Wabasha, Standing Buffalo, and Taopi (a Mdewakanton chief). Chief Red Iron's people dug rifle pits around the camp, expecting that they would have to defend the captives from Chief Little Crow and his men. However, Little Crow was defeated at Wood Lake and the camp was not attacked." (Submitted on October 8, 2013.) 

2. Minnesota Historical Society. The U.S.-Dakota War of 1862. (Submitted on October 8, 2013.) 

3. Camp Release State Monument. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on October 8, 2013.) 
 
Categories. Wars, US Indian
 
Camp Release State Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
4. Camp Release State Monument
western side
Camp Release State Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
5. Camp Release State Monument
Camp Release State Monument image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, September 25, 2013
6. Camp Release State Monument
National Register of Historic Places #73000981
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 313 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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