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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Havre de Grace in Harford County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

British Landing

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

 
 
British Landing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 4, 2013
1. British Landing Marker
Inscription. The town's defenders -- numbering about 20 -- failed to prevent some 400 British troops from coming ashore May 3, 1813.

A gun battery, probably located north of where the lighthouse now stands, was manned single-handedly by John O'Niell for a short time. He was later caught with two muskets and imprisoned on a British ship for several days.

"I observed Guns fired and American Colours hoisted at a battery lately erected at Havre-de-Grace...[we] opened [fire] on the Place...which was smartly returned from the Battery for a short time..." -- British Rear Admiral George Cockburn, May 3, 1813.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 39° 32.432′ N, 76° 5.077′ W. Marker is in Havre de Grace, Maryland, in Harford County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Lafayette Street and Concord Street. Click for map. The marker is along the water front walk near Concord Point Lighthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Havre de Grace MD 21078, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Susquehanna River/Chesapeake Bay (here, next to this
British Landing Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 4, 2013
2. British Landing Marker
marker); John O'Neill (a few steps from this marker); Principio Destroyed (within shouting distance of this marker); President William J. Clinton (within shouting distance of this marker); Concord Point Lighthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Keeper of the Light (within shouting distance of this marker); Havre de Grace (within shouting distance of this marker); Dangerous Waters (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Havre de Grace.
 
Also see . . .  John O’Neill Was The Defender Of Havre de Grace, Md., In War Of 1812. by Patrick McSherry, Artilleryman Magazine, Fall 2002. (Submitted on October 11, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. War of 1812
 
John O'Neill mans his gun alone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 4, 2013
3. John O'Neill mans his gun alone
Close-up of image on marker
Gerry Embleton, artist
Family Trait image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 4, 2013
4. Family Trait
O'Neill's 15-year-old daughter, Matilda, reportedly helped negotiate her father's release. Tradition holds that British Rear Admiral Cockburn was so impressed with the young girl's bravery he gave her a tortoise-shell box.
Close-up of image on marker
Maryland Historical Society
Box<br>In the Maryland Historical Society Museum image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
5. Box
In the Maryland Historical Society Museum
“According to legend, Matilda O'Neill (1796-1867) recieved this tortoise shell box from British Admiral Sir George Cockburn (1772-1853) aboard H.M.S. frigate Maidstone, where her father, John O'Neill (1768-1838) was being held prisoner. Cockburn is said to have given it to her as reward for her bravery when she negotiated with a town delegation for her father's release.” — Maryland Historical Society
Presentation Sword<br>In the Maryland Historical Society Museum image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
6. Presentation Sword
In the Maryland Historical Society Museum
Several gentlemen of Philadelphia gave this presentation sword to John O'Neill (1768-1838) as a token of respect after his single-handed attempt to defend Havre de Grace from a British Raid.…inscribed ’Presented to the Gallant O'Neill for his valor at Havre de Grace by Philadelphians 1813‘“ — Maryland Historical Society
The Mouth of the Susquehanna image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 4, 2013
7. The Mouth of the Susquehanna
A nearby marker indicates that this spot sits near the mouth of the Susquehanna River where the river debouches into the Chesapeake Bay, its sunken estuary.

This marker signifies the point where the beautiful Susquehanna River completes its 444 mile journey to meet the Chesapeake Bay

Presented to City of Havre de Grace by the Susquehanna River Basin Commission May 18, 1995.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 378 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on December 20, 2016.
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