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Mosheim in Greene County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Battles of Blue Springs

Fighting on the Same Ground Twice

 
 
Battles of Blue Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 30, 2013
1. Battles of Blue Springs Marker
Inscription. On the morning of October 10, 1863, Union Gen. Ambrose E. Burnsideís campaign suddenly arrived at Blue Springs (present-day Mosheim) when Union cavalry attacked Confederate General John S. Williamsís troops. By noon, the Confederate lines were stretched to the breaking point. At 5 P.M., Union infantrymen broke through the forward line of rifle pits, but heavy cannon and musket fire from the main Confederate positions drove them back. Three more assaults on the main Confederate line failed when Confederate Infantry and artillery fire shot them to pieces. After dark, the Confederates withdrew. The Federals pursued them in the morning, and later that day they met again in Rheatown. The tired Confederates escaped toward Jonesborough.

Union Gen. Alvan C. Gillemís cavalry force marching from Bulls Gap met a small Confederate force on the same battlefield on August 23, 1864. The Federals engaged Confederate Col. Henry L. Giltnerís 4th Kentucky Cavalry pickets and drove them back two miles toward the ridge south of Greeneville Road, where they encountered more Confederate troops. Giltnerís men repulsed repeated Union attacks. Then William Brown, a local boy, pointed out a “by road” to Union Col. John K. Miller who used it to reposition his 13th Tennessee Cavalry. His next attack turned the Confederate left flank. A frontal
Battles of Blue Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 30, 2013
2. Battles of Blue Springs Marker
Close up of the map in the lower left side of the marker
assault then broke the Confederate line and resulted in “a running fight, which was closed by night two miles beyond Greeneville, the enemy halting and endeavoring several times to reform.” Gillem reported Union control of Greene County was again assured, for the time being.

(captions)
Lloyd's Official Map of the State of Tennessee, 1863 Courtesy Library of Congress
Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside Courtesy Library of Congress
Gen. Alvan C. Gillem Courtesy Library of Congress
Gen John S. Williams Courtesy Library of Congress
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 11.152′ N, 82° 56.068′ W. Marker is in Mosheim, Tennessee, in Greene County. Marker is on West Andrew Johnson Highway (U.S. 11E) west of Emerald Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6766 West Andrew Johnson Highway, Mosheim TN 37818, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Blue Springs (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Blue Springs Lutheran Congregation
Battles of Blue Springs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 30, 2013
3. Battles of Blue Springs Marker
(approx. 1.4 miles away); Pottertown Bridge Burners (approx. 4.5 miles away); Execution of the "Bridge-Burners" (approx. 4.7 miles away); George Clem School (approx. 5.5 miles away); Bridge Burners (approx. 5.7 miles away); Andrew Johnson National Cemetery (approx. 5.8 miles away); Andrew Johnson and Eliza Johnson Grave Marker (approx. 5.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Mosheim.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 476 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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