Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Second Army Corps

Kimball's Brigade, French's Division

 
 
Kimballl's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
1. Kimballl's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
U.S.A.
Second Army Corps,
Kimball's Brigade, French's Division

Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, Commanding.
Organization.
14th Indiana Infantry,
8th Ohio Infantry,
132d Pennsylvania Infantry,
7th West Virginia Infantry.
September 17, 1862.

Kimball's Brigade following Weber and Morris, encountered the enemy in the Bloody Lane and in the Cornfield to the south.

The contest there was of the most desperate character, and continued until after noon when, supported on the left by Richardson's Division, the brigade attacked the enemy and gained the Bloody Lane.

An attack on the right flank was met and repulsed by a change of front of the Ohio and Indiana regiments, forming the right wing of the brigade in its final assault on the enemy's position.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 41.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.287′ N, 77° 44.415′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Richardson Avenue, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Second Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Second Army Corps Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 130th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Second Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Second Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); French's Division, Second Army Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); 8th Ohio Regiment (within shouting distance of this marker); 5th Maryland Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); The 14th Indiana Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on April 7, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, II Corps. Describing the Sunken Road in his official report, Kimball wrote, The loss in my command is a lasting testimony of the sanguinary nature of the conflict. The loss in my command is a lasting testimony of the sanguinary nature of the conflict, and a glance at the position held by the rebels tells how terrible was the punishment inflicted on them. The corn-fields on the front are strewn with their dead and wounded, and in the
Kimball's Brigade Tablet Stands along the Sunken Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
3. Kimball's Brigade Tablet Stands along the Sunken Road
In the background, along the high ground, is the 5th Maryland, Companies A and I Monument.
ditch first occupied by them the bodies are so numerous that they seem to have fallen dead in line of battle, for there is a battalion of dead rebels.
(Submitted on April 7, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Second Army Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Second Army Corps Marker
Kimball's Brigade Breaks through the Sunken Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
5. Kimball's Brigade Breaks through the Sunken Road
Looking east down the Sunken Road. The Roulette Farm Lane intersects the road at the stone wall in the center of the photo. The 14th Indiana and 8th Ohio broke through to the Sunken Lane in this vicinity.
Brig. General Nathan Kimball (1822-1898) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
6. Brig. General Nathan Kimball (1822-1898)
His brigade formed the right of the division during its series of assaults on the Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam, losing over 600 men killed or wounded. Despite the severe losses, the men held their ground and eventually pushed aside the Confederates in their front, capturing 300 men and several colors. Kimball's brigade became known as the "Gibraltar Brigade" for their steadfast ability to withstand enemy fire.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,019 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement