Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hagerstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wilson Bridge

Link Between East and West

 
 
Wilson Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 5, 2006
1. Wilson Bridge Marker
Inscription. Built in 1819, this five-arch structure, named for nearby village, was first stone bridge in Washington County. Erected by Silas Harry at cost of $12,000, it was a major improvement to road system between Baltimore and Cumberland, providing continuous smooth surface from Eastern Seaboard to western wilderness. It is one of two oldest bridges remaining on the National Pike (first federally financed road in the U.S.). Wilson Bridge carried traffic until seriously damaged by storm flooding in 1972.

Placed on National Historic Register, 1982.
 
Erected by the Washington County Historical Society; the Maryland Historical Society; and the Washington County Committee, Maryland Historical Trust.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 39° 39.449′ N, 77° 50.763′ W. Marker is near Hagerstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Baltimore National Pike (U.S. 40)
Wilson Bridge as Viewed From the Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 5, 2006
2. Wilson Bridge as Viewed From the Marker
and Stone Bridge Drive, on the right when traveling west on Baltimore National Pike. Click for map. Marker is just east of the current U.S. 40 Conococheague Bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Wilson Bridge (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 0.3 miles away); Wilsonís Store (approx. 0.3 miles away); “The Bank Road” (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 1.1 miles away).
 
More about this marker. One of the few Maryland roadside markers of this style with only one face. Back of marker is blank.
 
Regarding Wilson Bridge. Just beyond the marker is Wilson Bridge Park with parking and picnic tables under trees and a grassy bank along the river from which the bridge can be viewed.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wilson Bridge. (Submitted on November 18, 2006.)
Wilson Bridge Carried the National Pike Across the Conococheague Creek image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 5, 2006
3. Wilson Bridge Carried the National Pike Across the Conococheague Creek

2. Wilson's Bridge. (PDF) WA-V-001, National Register Form. (Submitted on October 30, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

3. Wilson Bridge. Route 40 Net. (Submitted on October 30, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRoads & Vehicles
 
1984<br>Wilson Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2004
4. 1984
Wilson Bridge
Restored by Board of
County Commissioners
Ronald L. Bowers, President
Richard E. Roulette, Vice President
R. Lee Downey
John R. Salvatore
Martin Snook
In Cooperation with
Maryland Historical Trust
Built By Silas Harry 1819 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2004
5. Built By Silas Harry 1819
7 Miles to Hagerstown
60 miles to Cumberland

Restored by
LeRoy E. Myers
1984
Wilson Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 14, 2004
6. Wilson Bridge
Collapsed Roadway, 1983 image. Click for full size.
HABS - Library of Congress
7. Collapsed Roadway, 1983
Wilson Bridge<br>South Elevation & Plan view, showing collapsed roadway image. Click for full size.
HABS - Library of Congress
8. Wilson Bridge
South Elevation & Plan view, showing collapsed roadway
“The Wilson Bridge was built in 1819 by Silas Harry as part of an improvement of roads leading to the National Road at Cumberland, MD. Its five stone arches span 215 feet over Conococheaque Creek 7 miles west of Hagerstown. The Wilson Bridge was one of a few multiple arch structures on the National Road and was considered one of the finest. The contract price for the bridge was $9,100 and the construction took approximately 18 months to complete. Bypassed in 1934 by a new concrete arch bridge, the bridge continued in service until 1972. In 1982, half of the center and an adjacent arch to the west collapsed on the upstream side. The bridge is {1983} scheduled to be demolished, hence the reason for this recording project.”
HABS Wilson Bridge Recording Project
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,495 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on November 2, 2016.
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