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San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

San Francisco Port of Embarkation

 
 
San Francisco Port of Embarkation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, October 16, 2013
1. San Francisco Port of Embarkation Marker
Inscription.
Army’s primary depot for Pacific operation

First garrisoned by U.S. Army troops during the Civil War, Fort Mason later played a key role in the emergence of the United States as an international power. Throughout the 1800s, the young country’s military resources were focused on subduing Native Americans and supporting the nation’s expansion across the continent. Beginning with the Spanish-American War in 1898, the focus shifted overseas. Between 1909 and 1914, the army developed Fort Mason to support U.S. interests in the Pacific.

Fully operational by 1915, and known as the San Francisco Port of Embarkation since 1932, the Fort Mason depot operated until 1962. In the 1970s, the long-vacant buildings were rehabilitated and today look much as they did when they were first constructed.

Center Side Bar:
Pacific locations to which troops and supplies were shipped from the Port of Embarkation:
Hawaii • Guam • Philippines • Alaska • Aleutian Islands • China • Panama Canal • Guadalcanal • Japan • Korea.

During World War II, the San Francisco Port of Embarkation experienced explosive growth. The numbers only begin to tell the story.
In 1939
Employed 831 people
Shipped 48,000 tons of cargo

By the end of the war in 1948
Employed more than 30,000 people
Shipped 23.6 million tons of cargo and 1.65 million soldiers.
San Francisco Port of Embarkation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, October 16, 2013
2. San Francisco Port of Embarkation Marker
Remnants of the historic train tracks can be seen to the left of the marker, running along the western side of the building.


Look about today and you'll see remnants of the historic train tracks seen in this photo.

Bottom Side Bar
Military Architecture
On U.S. Army posts around the world, the Quartermaster Corps once managed living quarters, supplies, and transportation, among other duties. The quartermaster insignia symbolizes these responsibilities:
eagle represents the nation
sword signifies the military forces
key signifies the Corps’ storekeeping function
wheel (styled after a six-mule-wagon wheel) represents transportation
wheel’s thirteen spokes and stars represents the original thirteen colonies and the Corp’s origin during the Revolutionary War.

Look for the Quartermaster insignia on Fort Mason’s historic pier buildings.

As the army’s role extended abroad, military planners turned to local influences for the new depot facility. They looked to the southwest’s Spanish Colonial missions for inspiration and chose Mission Revival-style architecture for Fort Mason’s warehouses. Eventually the Mission revival style would be so closely associated with the West Coast military architecture that red-tiled roofs and unadorned white walls would indicate military presence.
 
Erected by Golden Gate National Recreation Area.
 
Location. 37° 48.388′ N, 122° 25.913′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker can be reached from Marina Boulevard. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Marina Boulevard, San Francisco CA 94123, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Mason (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Mason Historic District (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named San Francisco Port of Embarkation (approx. 0.2 miles away); San Francisco Port of Embarkation (1932-1962) (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Mason Historic District (approx. 0.3 miles away); Marina Air Field (approx. half a mile away); First Ship into San Francisco Bay (approx. half a mile away); The Carpenter Shop... (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. This markers is in the lower Fort Mason parking lot in front of Building B.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 284 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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