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Waterford in Saratoga County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Waterford Bridges

National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark

 
 
Waterford Bridges Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 11, 2013
1. Waterford Bridges Marker
Inscription.
National Historic
Civil Engineering Landmark

Waterford Bridges
Waterford, New York
The Union Bridge, the first to cross the lower Hudson River was built in 1804 at this site by Theodore Burr and lasted for 105 years until it was burned and replaced by the existing steel bridge, the second bridge, designed by Alfred P. Boller and Henry Hodge, was built in 1909 by the Phoneix Bridge Company. Together these two bridges, on the same piers, have served the area for 209 years.
Constructed: 1804 and 1909
Designated: 2013

 
Erected 2013 by American Society of Civil Engineers.
 
Location. 42° 47.343′ N, 73° 40.505′ W. Marker is in Waterford, New York, in Saratoga County. Marker is on Broad Street (New York State Route 4), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Waterford NY 12188, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Union Bridge (here, next to this marker); Troy - Waterford Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Gen. Henry Knox Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Waterford Station
Waterford Bridges Marker & RiverSpark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 11, 2013
2. Waterford Bridges Marker & RiverSpark Marker
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Lock 2 Park (approx. 0.3 miles away); Flight of Five Locks (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Matton Shipyard (approx. mile away); Herman Melville (approx. 1.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Waterford.
 
More about this marker. The Waterford Bridges were honored as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark on September 8, 2013 in Waterford in association with the closing of the annual Waterford Tugboat Roundup festivities.
 
Regarding Waterford Bridges. Troy Union Bridge Burned.
Collapse of Spans of 1804 Structure Dropped Firemen Into Hudson.
Special to The New York Times.


Troy, N. Y., July 10. - The Union Bridge, which spanned the Hudson River from Troy to Waterford, two and one miles above tidewater, was destroyed by fire this afternoon.

The old structure was built entirely of wood and was opened to the public in 1804. It has been in continual service since, although it was remodeled in 1860. The bridge was 800 feet long and 30 feet wide, comprising four arches resting on the three pillars and two abutments. It was an
Waterford Bridges Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 11, 2013
3. Waterford Bridges Marker
The marker is attached to the bridge truss on the right, just above the guard rail.
enclosed structure with glass windows stretching the entire length of its walls.

The fire was fanned by a stiff wind, and exploding gas pipes accelerated its spread and drove fire fighters from the bridge.

After a half hour's burning three spans dropped into the river and with them six members of the volunteer fire department. They were rescued with difficulty and escaped injury.

The bridge carried the Hudson Valley Railway tracks across the river and was largely used by automobile parties going to Saratoga and the Adirondack resorts.
 
Additional keywords. Lansingburgh 126th Street Bridge Closed
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & Streetcars
 
The 1804 Wooden Covered Waterford Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 11, 2013
4. The 1804 Wooden Covered Waterford Bridge
This photo is on an information kiosk in the park near the bridge.
The 1909 Waterford Bridge & Hudson River image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous
5. The 1909 Waterford Bridge & Hudson River
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 234 times since then and 7 times this year. Last updated on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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