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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Centerville in Linn County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Ft. Scott and California Road

 
 
Ft. Scott and California Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2013
1. Ft. Scott and California Road Marker
Inscription.

This road was used by settlers going to Ft. Scott, where groups going to California and New Mexico were escorted by the U.S. Calvary [sic - Cavalry]

This is the only section of the road to still exist

 
Erected by Indian Awareness Center of the Fulton County Historical Society and St. Philippine Duchesne Memorial Park Committee.
 
Location. 38° 14.105′ N, 94° 56.59′ W. Marker is near Centerville, Kansas, in Linn County. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of St. Philippine Duchesne Memorial Park, off 1525th Road, about four miles ENE of Centerville. Marker is in this post office area: Centerville KS 66014, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "Quah-Kah-Ka-Num-Ad" (within shouting distance of this marker); Father Petit and the Trail of Death (within shouting distance of this marker); Daily Offering (within shouting distance of this marker); Log Cabin School (within shouting distance of this marker); Priests House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Log Convent
Ft. Scott and California Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2013
2. Ft. Scott and California Road Marker
(about 300 feet away); Father Petit and the Potawatomi 'Trail of Death' (about 300 feet away); Potawatomi "Trail of Death" march & death of Fr. Petit (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Centerville.
 
Regarding Ft. Scott and California Road. The U.S. Army closed Fort Scott in 1853. Dragoons (i.e. cavalry) stationed there only occasionally escorted wagon trains across the Great Plains, and never escorted settlers to California.
 
Also see . . .
1. St. Philippine Duchesne Memorial Park. (Submitted on December 2, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Fort Scott National Historic Site. (Submitted on December 2, 2013, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Ft. Scott and California Road image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 25, 2013
3. Ft. Scott and California Road
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 185 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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