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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Independence in Inyo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Legacy

Manzanar National Historic Site

 
 
Legacy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 10, 2009
1. Legacy Marker
Inscription. Over the years, this monument has become an icon, inspiring a grass-roots movement to preserve Manzanar and remember the sacrifices of 120,313 Japanese Americans confined by their own government. Buddhist minister Sentoku Mayed and Christian minister Shoichi Wakahiro first returned here on Memorial Day 1946. For the next 30 years, they made “pilgrimages” to honor Manzanar’s dead.

Amid the 1960s civil rights struggles, younger Japanese Americans spoke out, shattering their elders’ silence and shame about the camps. On a cold December day in 1969, 150 people journeyed here on the first organized pilgrimage. An annual event since, the Manzanar Pilgrimage attracts hundreds of people of all ages from diverse backgrounds. On the last Saturday of April, they gather here for a day of remembrance with speeches, a memorial service, an traditional ondo dance.

Visiting the cemetery anytime can be a personal pilgrimage—of reflection, worship, remembrance, or protest. Some people leave offerings---coins, personal mementos, paper cranes, water and sake, and religious items—as outward expressions of the ongoing, unspoken conversations about America’s past and future.

(Quote at the bottom of the marker:)
“America is strong as it makes amends for the wrongs it has
Legacy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 10, 2009
2. Legacy Marker
This photo is the left side of the main marker
committed…We will always remember Manzanar because of that.” –Sue Kunitomi Embry

(Inscription on the left side of the marker:)
Sue Kunitomi Embry 1923-2006-Sue Kunitomi arrived at Manzanar in May 1942, at age 19. In camp, she served as a teacher’s aid, wove camouflage nets to support the war effort, and worked as a reporter and then managing editor of the Manzanar Free Press.
Years later Sue Kunitomi Embry was among the first of her generation to speak out about the camps. As the driving force behind the Manzanar Committee, she organized the Manzanar Pilgrimage for 37 years and worked tirelessly to ensure that this site and its stories would be preserved to protect the human and civil rights of all. Today, Sue’s legacy endures in the ongoing work of informing and inspiring future generations.
 
Erected by National Park Service-United States Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 36° 43.524′ N, 118° 9.708′ W. Marker is in Independence, California, in Inyo County. Marker can be reached from Unnamed Road. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5001 Highway 395 (Entrance to the Site), Independence CA 93526, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies
Memorial Obelisk image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 10, 2009
3. Memorial Obelisk
. Sacred Space (within shouting distance of this marker); Weaving for the War (approx. 0.7 miles away); A Community's Living Room (approx. 0.8 miles away); Manzanar (approx. 0.9 miles away); Alabama Gates (approx. 4.8 miles away); Edwards House (approx. 5.7 miles away); Mary Austin’s Home (approx. 5.7 miles away); Putnam’s Stone Cabin (approx. 5.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Independence.
 
Categories. Asian AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesWar, World II
 
Memorial Obelisk image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 10, 2009
4. Memorial Obelisk
Manzanar Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 10, 2009
5. Manzanar Cemetery
Manzanar Entrance Sign image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 10, 2009
6. Manzanar Entrance Sign
Manzanar National Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 10, 2009
7. Manzanar National Historic Site
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 356 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of a full view of the marker. • Full view of marker and its surroundings. • • Can you help?
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