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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Claremont in Catawba County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Bunker Hill Covered Bridge

 
 
Bunker Hill Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 1, 2010
1. Bunker Hill Covered Bridge Marker
Inscription. County commissioners, in 1894, called local land owners to build and maintain a bridge across Lyles Creek. In response, landowners hired the services of Andy J. Ramsour, keeper of Horse Ford covered bridge over the Catawba River, at Hickory. In 1895, Ramsour, along with Eli Kale, George Moller, Cain Bost, and Electious Connor, built the bridge according to a design Ramsour probably found in a popular book on bridge building. Originally built as an open span, it was covered five years after initial construction.

Bunker Hill Bridge was part of Island Ford Road (a former Indian Trail), which had remained important throughout the state's western development. During the colonial period, the road served as a route to transport British prisoners of war after the 1781 Battle of Cowpens. "The Morgan army, with hundreds of prisoners and captured horses and wagons, stretched more than two miles as it approached the Island Ford." By the middle of the 20th century, the road became a major thoroughfare, as US Hwy 64/70.

The name Bunker Hill comes from the local Bunker Hill Farm operated by the descendents of the Staford and Lawrence families since the early 1800s. The bridge is also near the site of an early post office of the same name.

The bridge is made of oak with trunnels (wooden pins) instead of nails. The roof
Bunker Hill Covered Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Cox, December 26, 2011
2. Bunker Hill Covered Bridge
Marker is near the west entrance to the bridge
was originally covered with wooden shingles. It was replaced with tin in 1921. A major restoration in 1994, by the firm Arnold Graton and Sons of New Hampshire has stabilized the structure.

At least 10 covered bridges existed in Catawba County during the 19th century. Many were destroyed in the floods of 1916 and 1940; others were phased out of use by the state legislature's Good Rods Movement of the 1920s. Today there are only two covered bridges in North Carolina (Catawba and Randolph Counties).
 
Location. 35° 43.289′ N, 81° 6.926′ W. Marker is near Claremont, North Carolina, in Catawba County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 70 0.2 miles east of Bridgewood Drive, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker and bridge are not accessible by vehicle. They are reached by a short (less than 1/4 mile) hike from the parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Claremont NC 28610, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Herman Haupt (here, next to this marker); Covered Bridges (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Bunker Hill Covered Bridge (approx. 0.2 miles away); Clio's Nursery (approx. 15.1 miles away); William Sharpe (approx. 16 miles away).
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRoads & VehiclesWar, US Revolutionary
 
West End of Bunker Hill Covered Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 1, 2010
3. West End of Bunker Hill Covered Bridge
Interior of Bunker Hill Covered Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 1, 2010
4. Interior of Bunker Hill Covered Bridge
Bunker Hill Covered Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, May 1, 2010
5. Bunker Hill Covered Bridge
National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark image. Click for full size.
By Jamie Cox, December 26, 2011
6. National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark
Located across from marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 325 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   2. submitted on , by Jamie Cox of Melbourne, Florida.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   6. submitted on , by Jamie Cox of Melbourne, Florida. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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