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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Dependence on Slave Labor

Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial

 
 
Dependence of Slave Labor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2013
1. Dependence of Slave Labor Marker
Inscription. Unlike the planters in the lower south, the Custis and Lee family grew mostly food crops on this 1,100 acre plantation as well as at two other sites. George Washington Park Custis limited the cultivation of cotton and tobacco because they were labor intensive and exhausted the soil.

Custis did not make enough money from his other crops to support large numbers of slaves, thus he was not as dependent on slave labor as others. It was his intent to free his slaves, which he did through his will five years after his death in 1857.

The other Custis-Lee plantations, White House, and Romancoke in the central tidewater of Virginia (almost 10,000 acres in total) generated most of the families' income.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 38° 52.893′ N, 77° 4.373′ W. Marker is in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker can be reached from Sherman Drive 0.1 miles south of Lincoln Drive, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in the garden north of Arlington House near Custis Walk. Marker is at or near this postal address: 321 Sherman Drive, Fort Myer VA 22211, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kitchen Garden (a few steps from this marker
Dependence of Slave Labor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2013
2. Dependence of Slave Labor Marker
but has been reported missing); A Garden Sustains (a few steps from this marker); Arlington Estate, 1860 (within shouting distance of this marker); Guardian of a Nation's Heritage (within shouting distance of this marker); Mary Randolph (within shouting distance of this marker); Pierre Charles L'Enfant (within shouting distance of this marker); The Arlington Woodlands (within shouting distance of this marker); The Kingdom of My Childhood (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Arlington National Cemetery.
 
Also see . . .  Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial. National Park Service (Submitted on December 1, 2013.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansAgriculture
 
Dependence on Slave Labor Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, March 15, 2016
3. Dependence on Slave Labor Marker
The marker is on the left, with the "A Garden Sustains" marker on the right, both just north of Arlington House.
Tobacco Leaf Platter image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2013
4. Tobacco Leaf Platter
A tobacco leaf china set passed down through the family.
Close-up of photo on marker
Nankeen Cotton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2013
5. Nankeen Cotton
Nankeen cotton has a brown boll and was grown at the White House and Romancoke Plantations. Cotton provided the fabric to clothe the enslaved workers.
Close-up of photos on marker
American Shad - <i>Alosa sapidissima</i> image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2013
6. American Shad - Alosa sapidissima
Wheat and corn were the primary money crops. Timber, brandy, and butter provided additional income along with the Potomac and Pamunkey River fisheries.
Close-up of picture on marker
Flax image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2013
7. Flax
Flax was spun into linen and used for everything from elegant handkerchiefs to bandages for the wounded in the Civil War.
Close-up of photos on marker
Brown Boll of Nankeen Cotton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2013
8. Brown Boll of Nankeen Cotton
in the garden at Arlington House
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 322 times since then and 14 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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