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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Arlington House, 1864

 
 
Arlington House, 1864 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 24, 2008
1. Arlington House, 1864 Marker
Inscription. On May 24, 1861, Union troops crossed the Potomac River into Virgina and occupied the Arlington Estate. Officers lived in the house while hundreds of soldiers camped on the grounds. The Army crisscrossed the estate with roads and telegraph lines, and cut most of the 200 acres of virgin oak forest behind the house for fortifications and fire wood. This Civil War photograph was taken from approximately where you are standing.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 38° 52.847′ N, 77° 4.352′ W. Marker was in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker could be reached from Lee Drive. Click for map. "Arlington House" (a.k.a. the Custis-Lee Mansion and/or the Robert E. Lee Memorial) is within the National Cemetery, on a hilltop accessible by pedestrian and tour buses, about 0.15 mile northeast of the intersection of Sheridan and Sherman Drives. Marker was in this post office area: Fort Myer VA 22211, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Garden to Graves (a few steps from this marker); The Flower Garden (a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing); The Kingdom of My Childhood
Arlington House, 1864 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 14, 2008
2. Arlington House, 1864 Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Pierre Charles L'Enfant (within shouting distance of this marker); Guardian of a Nation's Heritage (within shouting distance of this marker); Arlington Estate, 1860 (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War Unknowns Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); The Arlington Woodlands (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Arlington National Cemetery.
 
Also see . . .  Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial. National Park Service (Submitted on December 10, 2013.) 
 
Additional keywords. Custis-Lee Mansion; Horatio G. Wright; Arlington National Cemetery.
 
Categories. LandmarksNotable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
Arlington House, 1864 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2013
3. Arlington House, 1864 Marker
Marker tablet without marker.
Arlington House, seen from near President John F. Kennedy's gravesite below image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 30, 2008
4. Arlington House, seen from near President John F. Kennedy's gravesite below
Note the prominent monument to Brevet Maj. Gen. Horatio G. Wright at the crest of the hill, in front of the trees to the right. During the Civil War, General Wright was a key leader within the Army of the Potomac, ending the war as a Corps commander. General Wright served as Army Chief of Engineers after his Civil War service, overseeing the completion of the Washington Monument. Accordingly, he was buried at Arlington House with its view of that monument (then the tallest structure in the world) in mind.
Arlington House, viewed from near Senator Edward Kennedy's gravesite. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 30, 2009
5. Arlington House, viewed from near Senator Edward Kennedy's gravesite.
View from Arlington House toward the Washington Monument, President Kennedy's gravesite, lower left. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, 8.24.08
6. View from Arlington House toward the Washington Monument, President Kennedy's gravesite, lower left.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,359 times since then and 18 times this year. Last updated on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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