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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Executive Office Building

 
 
Executive Office Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
1. Executive Office Building Marker
Inscription.
Originally
State, War, and Navy Departments
Constructed 1871-1888

South Wing
Ground broken June 1871
Completed December 1875

East Wing
Ground broken July 1872
Completed April 1879

North Wing
Ground broken July 1879
Completed December 1882

West and Central Wings
Ground broken March 1884
Completed January 1888

Total construction time 17 years and 4 months


On this site in 1871 stood the President's stables, the Old Navy Building designed in 1797 by George Hadfield and the Old War Building designed in 1818 by James Hoban as companions to the Treasury and State Buildings on the west side of the White House. The present building was constructed in four stages around the two-story public offices, as they were officially known, in order to continue their use until the respective wings were completed.

At the demolition of "old war" in 1879 six columns from the entrance portico were used to decorate the Sheridan Gate entrance to Arlington National Cemetery.

On July 3, 1930, through congressional action, the building name was officially changed to "Department of State Building."

In 1949 the building was officially named the Executive Office Building and is now occupied by the President's Executive Office staff. It had been vacated by Navy
Executive Office Building Marker image. Click for full size.
National Archives and Records Administration
2. Executive Office Building Marker
in 1918, the War Department in 1938, and the State Department in 1942.

Two Presidents have had offices here: Herbert Hoover, December 26, 1929-April 30, 1930 and Richard Nixon 1969-1974; and five future presidents, Theodore Roosevelt, Assistant Secretary of the Navy; William Howard Taft, Secretary of War; Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Assistant Secretary of Navy; Lyndon B. Johnson, Vice-President; Gerald Ford, Vice President.

The design is generally described as "second empire style" and the building is one of seven structures designed by the supervising architect in this style, beginning in 1869. Only the Executive Office Building and the Custom House and Post Office in St. Louis have survived.

Supervising Architect
Alfred Bult Mullett (1834-1890)

Chief Designer
Richard Von Ezdorf (1848-1926)

Superintendent of Construction
Colonel Thomas Lincoln Casey (1831-1896)
Corps of Engineers, U.S.A.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.912′ N, 77° 2.311′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Pennsylvania Avenue and West Executive Avenue, on the
Plan View image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
3. Plan View
Close-up of image on marker
right when traveling east on Pennsylvania Avenue. Click for map. Located on the north side courtyard fence for the Old Executive Office building. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. State, War, and Navy Building (here, next to this marker); These Five-Inch Brass Trophy Guns (a few steps from this marker); Dwight D. Eisenhower Executive Office Building (a few steps from this marker); The Lee House (within shouting distance of this marker); First Home of the Reserve Officers Association (within shouting distance of this marker); In Honor of Leslie Coffelt (within shouting distance of this marker); Francis Preston Blair (within shouting distance of this marker); The Blair House (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Downtown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Old Executive Office Building. National Park Service page. (Submitted on December 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. The Eisenhower Executive Office Building. Among other interesting facts, this building had the first hydraulic lift elevator in a U.S. Government building. (Submitted on December 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional keywords.
Executive Office Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
4. Executive Office Building Marker
"Eisenhower Executive Office Building"; "White House Office Building"
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Executive Office Building image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2008
5. Executive Office Building
State, War and Navy Building image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
6. State, War and Navy Building
has been designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark
Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States.
U. S. Department of the Interior
National Park Service
1972
Dwight D. Eisenhower<br>Executive Office Building image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2015
7. Dwight D. Eisenhower
Executive Office Building
On November 9, 1999 the building (formerly the Old Executive Office Building) was renamed in honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,706 times since then and 32 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Matt Gholson of Houston, Texas.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6, 7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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