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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Coloma in El Dorado County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

James W. Marshall

1810 - 1885

 
 
James W. Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 19, 2008
1. James W. Marshall Marker
Inscription.
Erected by the State of California
in memory of
James W. Marshall
1810 - 1885
Whose discovery of gold
January 24, 1848
in the tailrace of Sutter’s Mill at Coloma
started the great rush of Argonauts.

 
Erected 1890 by the State of California and the Placerville Parlor, Native Sons of the Golden West.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 38° 47.794′ N, 120° 53.675′ W. Marker is in Coloma, California, in El Dorado County. Marker can be reached from Marshall Park Way (State Highway 153). Click for map. Marker is on the monument. A short drive up Marshall Park Way from State Highway 49 leads to a parking lot. The monument is a short walk up the steps at the back of the parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Coloma CA 95613, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 200th Anniversary of James W. Marshall's Birth (within shouting distance of this marker); Cabin of James Marshall (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mining Ditches (about 500 feet away);
James W. Marshall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 19, 2008
2. James W. Marshall Marker
Marker can be seen on the left.
Saint John’s Cemetery (about 600 feet away); Emmanuel Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); El Dorado County Jails (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sutter Mill Cemetery – 1848 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Pioneer Cemetery (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Coloma.
 
More about this marker. The Marshall Monument is a California Registered Historical Landmark (No. 143). The marker is located within the boundaries of the Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park. Marshall Park Way (California 153) is California's shortest state highway.

In his book California – A Landmark History, published by the Oakland Tribune in 1941, Joseph R. Knowland writes:

“The original Marshall Monument contained, until 1937, mute evidence of the controversy once waged, and now occasionally revived, over the date of the discovery and the much-mooted question whether a nugget, a flake, a particle, a specimen or some other form of gold was picked up at the mill.

The first date carved into the granite base of the monument was January 19, 1848. The discovery, in 1887, of
Front of the Monument image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 19, 2008
3. Front of the Monument
the diary of Henry W. Bigler, a Mormon laborer at Sutter’s Mill, fixed the date January 24, which General Sutter’s records and other evidence confirm. This later proof caused the Legislature to order the former date chiseled out and the correct one substituted. The first inscription mentioned that Marshall had picked up a “nugget.” Following a dispute of which newspapers and pamphlets issued during that period have left an interesting record, the Legislature of 1931 ordered “nugget” changed to “flake.” Again workman equipped with chisels mounted the base, removed the word “nugget” and carved in “flake.” Both changes were conspicuous, and the thousands who visited the monument and read the inscriptions were puzzled.

In 1938, the State Park Commission, noting the unfortunate appearance of the inscription and taking cognizance of certain errors in the old wording, ordered new bronze tablets to be placed over the original spaces. This was done, and the author, then chairman of the Park Commission, delegated by vote of the board to suggest the revised wording. The original inscription declared that Marshall was “Discoverer of Gold.”

History has revealed that gold was discovered in California as early as 1842, near San Fernando Mission, and samples forwarded to the United States Mint in Philadelphia.
Back of the Marshall Monument image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 19, 2008
4. Back of the Marshall Monument


There is no dispute that Marshall’s January 24, 1848, discovery started the great gold rush to California. On the questions of “flake” or “nugget,” a revival of this controversy was avoided by omitting both words and making the simple declaration that “Marshall’s discovery of gold started the great rush of Argonauts.” This wording was substituted on the theory that it is not significant and the world not particularly interested concerning the exact form or shape of the find except that it was gold.

The new and revised bronze tablet substituted in 1939, and approved by the Park Commission and Grand officers of the Native Sons, reads as follows: [See Inscription Text]

On the opposite side a new tablet, unchanged in wording from the original, but necessary for proper balance, contains the names of the original Commissioners, A. Caminetti, John R. Miller, George Hofmeister and H. C. Gesford. In 1941, Hofmeister was the only surviving member of the original commission.”
 
Regarding James W. Marshall. Never a good businessman, James Marshall failed to profit from the many opportunities the gold rush offered. He ended his days as a carpenter and a blacksmith in Kelsey, unrecognized officially for his unique roll in history.

After Marshall's death in 1885, local
James W. Marshall - 1884 image. Click for full size.
Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park 1977 Brochure
5. James W. Marshall - 1884
and state figures made plans to honor that role. Originating with the Placerville Parlor of Native Sons of the Golden West, the idea of a monument was suggested to the State Legislature, which appropriated a total of $9,000. On May 3, 1890, a crowd of 3,500 gathered at his hill-top gravesite for the unveiling ceremony, listening to poems, prayers, band music, and speeches praising Marshall and the forty-niners.

The statue is constructed of "statuary bronze," an alloy of lead, tin, and zinc painted a bronze color. Marshall points to the place on the American River where he discovered gold.

Source: information kiosk at the monument.
 
Categories. LandmarksNotable EventsNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
Carrying On image. Click for full size.
By James King, January 24, 2014
6. Carrying On
Native Sons of the Golden West pictured with the work of their forebears. (left to right)
Past Grand President Barney Noel (in back) • Supervising District Deputy Steve Wong (with friend) • Past Grand President Harly Harty (way in the back) • Former Governor General of the Past President's Association NSGW Tony Starelli • Future Native Son Connor Christeson (on the rail) • Past Grand President James Shadle • Georgetown Parlor member Val Rendon • Former Grand Historian Warren Trueblood • Past Grand President David Allen (in back) • Former First Lady Karen Shadle
Second Marker Located on the Monument. </b>It reads: image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, August 19, 2008
7. Second Marker Located on the Monument. It reads:
Commissioners for the State
A. Caminetti
John B. Miller - George Hofmeister
H.C. Gesford
The site of this monument is a gift
to the State of California from
Placerville Parlor, N.S.G.W.
Vintage Postcard of The Marshall Monument image. Click for full size.
By S. Inch & Son, Placerville,Ca
8. Vintage Postcard of The Marshall Monument
Note: This postcard is postmarked "Placerville, Ca Dec. 23, 1908
Vintage Postcard - Marshall's Blacksmith Shop in Kelsey (Mentioned Earlier) image. Click for full size.
By No Publisher Stated
9. Vintage Postcard - Marshall's Blacksmith Shop in Kelsey (Mentioned Earlier)
This site is California Registered Historical Landmark No.319. There is no marker. The only remaining part of this building is the chimney, which is on private property.
State Highway Sign on Marshall Parkway (State Highway 153) image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, October 7, 2008
10. State Highway Sign on Marshall Parkway (State Highway 153)
California's Shortest State Highway
Take Cold Springs Road to Marshall Park Way (State Hwy 153) to the monument.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 4,520 times since then and 59 times this year. Last updated on , by James King of San Miguel, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   5. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   6. submitted on , by James King of San Miguel, California.   7. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   8. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   9. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   10. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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