Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near St. Peter in Nicollet County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

A Minority in Their Homeland

 
 
A Minority in Their Homeland Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
1. A Minority in Their Homeland Marker
Inscription.
For generations, the land stretching out around you was the homeland of the Dakota Indians. Through treaties in 1851, the Dakota sold all of their land in southern Minnesota. The treaties disregarded Dakota people's traditional decision-making processes and were written in a language they hardly knew. Making an "X" on a piece of paper was not the same as the Dakota way of taking council and obtaining the majority's consent.

After the signings, the Dakota were coerced onto reservations on the Minnesota River—but only until that land, too, was needed for white settlement. By 1860, white settlers in the Minnesota River Valley outnumbered the Dakota five to one. In a single decade, the Dakota people had become a minority in their homeland.

Minnesota Historical Society
Fort Ridgely

 
Erected by the Minnesota Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Minnesota Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 44° 20.951′ N, 93° 57.05′ W. Marker is near St. Peter, Minnesota, in Nicollet County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of North Minnesota Avenue (U.S. 169) and Dodd Avenue (State Highway 22), on
A Minority in Their Homeland Marker image. Click for full size.
By K. Linzmeier, May 16, 2013
2. A Minority in Their Homeland Marker
the marker is at the left side of the photo
the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at the Nicollet County Historical Society Treaty Site History Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1851 North Minnesota Avenue, Saint Peter MN 56082, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Traverse des Sioux (a few steps from this marker); Welcome to Traverse des Sioux (within shouting distance of this marker); "Only a Memory Now" (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Land-Seas (about 500 feet away); Archaeology (about 600 feet away); Ministering to the Dakota (about 700 feet away); Ecakensdonyapi (about 700 feet away); The Rush for Land (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in St. Peter.
 
More about this marker. captions:
Treaty of Traverse des Sioux, 1851, courtesy National Archives
Francis B. Miller, Treaty of Traverse des Sioux, 1904
 
Also see . . .
1. The Treaty of Traverse des Sioux. Minnesota Historical Society. (Submitted on January 31, 2014.) 

2. Treaty of Traverse des Sioux. Wikipedia entry. "The forced change in lifestyle and the much lower than expected payments from the federal government caused economic suffering and increased social tensions within the tribes. Finally their resentments broke out in the Dakota War of 1862." (Submitted on January 31, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 265 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement