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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Northeast in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Roll Out the Barrel

Hub, Home, Heart

 

—Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail —

 
Roll Out the Barrel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
1. Roll Out the Barrel Marker
Inscription. Stuart-Hobson Middle School, one block to the east of this sign, was built in 1927 on the site of an old brewery, one of nearly two dozen that operated in DC after the Civil War. Almost all of the breweries were run by German immigrants who specialized in lager, a light alternative to the English-style ales widely produced by American brewers.

George Juenemann opened his brewery and beer garden here in 1857, ten years after he came to the United States. For nearly 30 years Juenemann's Mount Vernon lager, dance pavilion, bowling alley, and dining hall entertained Washingtonians. German American families gathered here for food, drink, and fellowship that offered all ages a reminder of home. The Juenemann family lived nearby, and some employees lived on the site.

Cincinnati brewer Albert Carry bought the complex after Juenemann's 1884 death, but sold it a few years later. The Washington Brewery Company, as its new owners renamed it, operated until Congress, with exclusive jurisdiction over DC, closed all city breweries in 1917, two years before Prohibition took hold nationwide.

In 1830, when this area was still "country," Concordia (Lutheran Evangelical) Church, of the Foggy Bottom section of Northwest DC, established its cemetery here. Nearly 30 years later, the city passed an ordinance prohibiting burials within its
Juenemann's Brewery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
2. Juenemann's Brewery
Left: George Juenemann, in light-colored coat at center, poses with workers behind his brewery, around 1865.

Right: This City Directory ad of 1872 promotes Juenemann's business.
limits (then Boundary Street, today's Florida Avenue, on the north). So Concordia dug up its burial ground and relocated the remains to Prospect Hill, about two miles away on North Capital Street.

(Back):
Trains and streetcars created the Near Northeast neighborhood around H Street. The B&O Railroad's arrival in 1835 made this a center of energetic, working-class life. Workmen living north of the Capitol staffed the Government Printing Office, ran the trains, stocked the warehouses, and built Union Station. When a streetcar arrived linking H Street to downtown, new construction quickly followed.

H Street bustled with shops and offices run by Jewish, Italian, Lebanese, Greek, Irish, and African American families. During the segregation era, which lasted into the 1950s, African Americans came to H Street for its department stores and sit-down restaurants. Most businesses welcomed all customers.

Then came the civil disturbances in the wake of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination in 1968. Decades of commercial decline followed. Just off H Street, though, the strong residential community endured. The 2005 opening of the Atlas Performing Arts Center signaled a revival, building evocatively on H Street's past. Hub, Home, Heart is a bridge to carry you from that past to the present.

Hub, Home, Heart: Greater H Street
Washington Brewery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
3. Washington Brewery
This ad for Washington Brewery shows its large facilities in 1892.
NE Heritage Trail
is an Official Washington, DC Walking Trail. The self-guided, 3.2-mile tour of 18 signs offers about two hours of gentle exercise. Free keepsake guidebooks in English or Spanish are available at businesses and institutions along the way. For more on DC neighborhoods, please visit www.CulturalTourismDC.org.
 
Erected 2012 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 4.)
 
Location. 38° 53.836′ N, 77° 0.133′ W. Marker is in Near Northeast, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of F Street, NE and 3rd Street, NE, on the right when traveling east on F Street, NE. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20002, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Swampoodle (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gateway to The Nation's Capital (about 800 feet away); Community Caretakers (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Freedom Bell (approx. ¼ mile away); Christopher Columbus (approx. ¼ mile away); Delaware Avenue & Columbus Circle, NE (approx. ¼ mile away); Sanctuaries (approx. 0.3 miles away); Nathanael Greene Monument (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Near Northeast.
 
Related markers. Click here for
German Beer Halls image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
4. German Beer Halls
Top: An artist's rendition of a typical family Sunday at a German immigrant beer hall in New York City, 1872. Washington's beer halls offered a similar atmosphere.

Bottom: A post card advertises a successor to Juenemann's venue.
a list of markers that are related to this marker. Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail
 
Categories. EntertainmentIndustry & CommerceNotable Places
 
Stuart Junior High School Students, 1928 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
5. Stuart Junior High School Students, 1928
Back of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
6. Back of Marker
Corner Grocery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
7. Corner Grocery
Leo Feldman was photographed in his corner grocery at 538 Third St., NE, around 1921. The house where he worked and lived with his family still stands to your left.
Map of the H Street Heritage Trail image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
8. Map of the H Street Heritage Trail
Roll Out the Barrel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
9. Roll Out the Barrel Marker
The Corner Grocery Today image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
10. The Corner Grocery Today
Corner of F and 3rd Streets, NE image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
11. Corner of F and 3rd Streets, NE
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 374 times since then and 2 times this year. Last updated on , by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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