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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Northeast in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sanctuaries

Hub, Home, Heart

 

—Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail —

 
Sanctuaries Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
1. Sanctuaries Marker
Inscription. Calvary Episcopal Church, half a block north at 820 Sixth Street, has been a community anchor since 1901. For most of its early years, the congregation, led by founding rector Reverend Franklin I.A. Bennett, met at 11th and G. In 1941 it welcomed the Reverend Dr. James O. West as rector. The dynamic Rev. West drew so many new members that soon the parish needed a larer sanctuary. Eight years later Calvary moved to its current home, the former Church of the Good Shepherd. West is remembered for co-founding the family social services center Hospitality House, sheltering and feeding the homeless in his rectory, and counseling troubled Vietnam veterans. "The city looked to him as a community leader," Judge Kaye K. Christian recalled.

Mount Olive Baptist Church at 1140 Sixth Street, three blocks north of this sign, was founded in 1873 as a branch of Second Baptist Church of Northwest DC. The current church rests on the site of its first meeting place, the home of Robert and Martha Terrell. Mount Olive has focused on serving needy members of the community with free food and clothing, holding outdoor evangelistic services, and mentoring teenaged boys, among other programs.

Radio station WOL operated from Fourth and H Streets during the 1980s and '90s. Neighbors remember the station's studio overlooking the street, where large windows
Church of the Good Shepherd becomes Calvary Episcopal image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
2. Church of the Good Shepherd becomes Calvary Episcopal
Left: Rev. James O. West of Calvary Episcopal Church, 1967.

Center: Church of the Good Shepherd, 1949.

Right: Ashley and Carrie Lyles were wed in the Church of the Good Shepherd the year the church opened, 1901. The diocese closed it in 1949, transferring the building to Calvary Episcopal Church.
revealed on-air guests and dynamic host Cathy Hughes.

To return to Union Station Metro station, continue on H Street, turn left on Third Street, then right on F Street. To reach Gallery Place Metro station, take the X2 Metrobus (Lafayette Square).

(Back):
Trains and streetcars created the Near Northeast neighborhood around H Street. The B&O Railroad's arrival in 1835 made this a center of energetic, working-class life. Workmen living north of the Capitol staffed the Government Printing Office, ran the trains, stocked the warehouses, and built Union Station. When a streetcar arrived linking H Street to downtown, new construction quickly followed.

H Street bustled with shops and offices run by Jewish, Italian, Lebanese, Greek, Irish, and African American families. During the segregation era, which lasted into the 1950s, African Americans came to H Street for its department stores and sit-down restaurants. Most businesses welcomed all customers.

Then came the civil disturbances in the wake of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination in 1968. Decades of commercial decline followed. Just off H Street, though, the strong residential community endured. The 2005 opening of the Atlas Performing Arts Center signaled a revival, building evocatively on H Street's past. Hub, Home, Heart is a bridge to carry you from that past
Mount Olive Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
3. Mount Olive Baptist Church
Horace Moore, chairman of the Mount Olive Baptist Church's Board of Deacons, at center in photo, was honored for 40 years of service with a dinner in the church during the 1940s. The church later named its annex in honor of Deacon Moore.
to the present.

Hub, Home, Heart: Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail is an Official Washington, DC Walking Trail. The self-guided, 3.2-mile tour of 18 signs offers about two hours of gentle exercise. Free keepsake guidebooks in English or Spanish are available at businesses and institutions along the way. For more on DC neighborhoods, please visit www.CulturalTourismDC.org.
 
Erected 2012 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 18.)
 
Location. 38° 54.01′ N, 76° 59.897′ W. Marker is in Near Northeast, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of H Street, NE and 6th Street, NE, on the right when traveling east on H Street, NE. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20002, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Get Behind the Wheel (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Fires of 1968 (about 700 feet away); At the Crossroads (approx. 0.2 miles away); Community Caretakers (approx. 0.2 miles away); Roll Out the Barrel (approx. 0.3 miles away); Swampoodle (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Changing Faces of H Street (approx. 0.4 miles away); Education for All (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Near Northeast.
 
Related markers.
Wol image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
4. Wol
WOL owner Cathy Hughes on the air in the H St. studio, 1994.
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Greater H Street NE Heritage Trail
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Notable Places
 
Back of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
5. Back of Marker
Calvary Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
6. Calvary Episcopal Church
Acolytes from Calvary Episcopal Church lead the procession at the retirement of Rev. James O. West after 48 years of service, 1990.
Map of the H Street Heritage Trail image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
7. Map of the H Street Heritage Trail
Sanctuaries Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
8. Sanctuaries Marker
Corner of H and 6th Streets with Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
9. Corner of H and 6th Streets with Marker
Calvary Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 29, 2012
10. Calvary Episcopal Church
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 229 times since then. Last updated on , by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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