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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Leandro in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Taming the Waters’ Flow

Lake Chabot Historical Walk

 
 
Taming the Waters’ Flow Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, February 3, 2014
1. Taming the Waters’ Flow Marker
Captions: The concrete structure to you left is one of the dam’s spillways, improved in 1980. When the lake becomes full, the spillway relieves excess water to San Leandro Creek below. Note how the spillway has changed from (photograph circa) 1878-1882 until today. (photo left); Rains washed out 21,000 cubic yards of the dam wall downstream. The runaway sediment is believed to have created Arrowhead Marsh at Martin Luther King, Jr. Regional Shoreline. (map below).
Inscription. “Aha!” exclaimed Anthony Chabot It was spring of 1866 when he saw the raging waters of San Leandro Creek collide with Grass Valley Creek. He studied the vast surrounding watershed and determined it could nourish a reservoir year-round. He had found his dam site.

Taming the waters’ flow would require engineering creativity, and unexpected setbacks. In the fall of 1874, Chabot watched as the rains washed out 21,000 cubic yards of the earthen dam wall downstream. The runaway sediment is believed to have created Arrowhead Marsh at Martin Luther King, Jr. Regional Shoreline. Once rebuilt, the reservoir was Oakland and San Leandro’s main water supply from 1876-1926.

EBMUD built Upper San Leandro Reservoir in 1926 and Pardee Reservoir in 1928 to supplement Lake Chabot water. In 1964 Lake Chabot was place on “stand-by” to be used only as an emergency drinking supply.

Chabot’s dam was not the first to be built here. In 1860 William Heath Davis, son-in-law of Don José Joaquin Estudillo, built a smaller earthen brush dam near the same site to provide water for Estudillo’s Ranch San Leandro, now the City of San Leandro.
 
Erected 2012 by East Bay Regional Park District.
 
Location. 37° 
Taming the Waters’ Flow Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, February 3, 2014
2. Taming the Waters’ Flow Marker
43.796′ N, 122° 7.367′ W. Marker is in San Leandro, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from Estudillo Avenue. Click for map. The one mile Lake Chabot Historical Walk begins at the parking lot at the end of Estudillo Avenue. This marker is about ¾ mile from the beginning of the trail. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1799 Estudillo Avenue, San Leandro CA 94577, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Yem-Po: Chinese Labor Camp (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Of Fins and Flippers (about 300 feet away); Tunnel No. 1 Control Shaft (about 300 feet away); A Zoo, a Monkey, and a Mansion Here Too! (about 400 feet away); Chabot Dam (about 600 feet away); Transporting the Water (about 700 feet away); To Build a Dam (about 700 feet away); Filtration Basins (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Leandro.
 
Also see . . .  Lake Chabot Historical Walk. (Submitted on February 21, 2014.)
 
Categories. Man-Made Features
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 274 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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