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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kula in Maui County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Ranch Wall

Haleakala National Park

 
 
Ranch Wall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 6, 2008
1. Ranch Wall Marker
Inscription. This ranch wall stacked stone by stone in the late 1800s, represents an investment in the land. Stretching for two miles, it guided cattle through the harsh landscape of Haleakala to pasture lands on the east and west sides of Maui. The ranching era shaped the economy and communities of Maui, which value rugged independence, self reliance, and sustainability. The paniolo (cowboy) culture still lives today on the slopes of Haleakala in neighboring ranches and communities.

Cattle also had a devastating impact on native vegetation, completely destroying some native forests and dramatically reducing others. The National Park’s investment in the land includes over 30 miles of fences to protect and preserve unique species, such as “ahinanima (silversword), and subalpine scrublands. Fences exclude cattle, pigs, goat, deer, and other grazers from destroying protected land in the park, providing resource managers the opportunity to restore and revive the native landscape.

By 1960 more than two million acres in Hawaii were used for cattle grazing, mostly in the cooler uplands. Whether ranch wall or park fence, boundaries delineate contracts in land use philosophies, between taming a wilderness landscape or preserving it in its original state.

The trail is dangerous…when you have cattle like that, some of those
Ranch wall made of stone-corner of marker shown in the photo image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 6, 2008
2. Ranch wall made of stone-corner of marker shown in the photo
sharp turns and steep banks, and it drops off and all that loose gravel…you don’t know what is going to happen. Retired ranch foreman Johnny Sakamoto, describing the cattle drive down Halemau’u Trail.
 
Erected by National Park Service-United States Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 20° 44.64′ N, 156° 13.794′ W. Marker is in Kula, Hawaii, in Maui County. Marker is on Crater Road. Click for map. The marker is located at the Leleiwi Overlook. Marker is in this post office area: Kula HI 96790, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wind, Wave and Wings-Oodemas maulense- (approx. 1.5 miles away); Hawaiian Goose or Nene (Nay-Nay (approx. 1.5 miles away); Haleakala National Park (approx. 2.4 miles away); Pa Ka'oao White Hill Trail (approx. 2.5 miles away); Holy Ghost Catholic Church (approx. 6.4 miles away); a different marker also named Haleakala National Park (approx. 11.4 miles away); Palapala Hoomau Congregational Church (approx. 13 miles away).
 
Categories. AnimalsIndustry & Commerce
 
Leleiwi "Flying Bone"-marker at beginning of trail image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 6, 2008
3. Leleiwi "Flying Bone"-marker at beginning of trail
This marker is near the Ranch Wall marker
Ranch Wall and distant pastures image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 6, 2008
4. Ranch Wall and distant pastures
Ranch Wall high up in the clouds image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 6, 2008
5. Ranch Wall high up in the clouds
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 349 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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