Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kailua-Kona in Hawaii County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Discovering Kaloko-Honokohau

Kaloko-Honokohau National Historic Park

 
 
Discovering Kaloko-Honokohau Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 10, 2008
1. Discovering Kaloko-Honokohau Marker
Inscription. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park celebrates the indigenous people of Hawaii. It penetrates deep into Hawaiian antiquity by preserving evidence of a thousand years of society. It links the touched with the heartfelt, transcending the physical into the spiritual by preserving values, ideas, beliefs and legends.

The park is a window into which you glimpse the lives of generations of Hawaiians, on the land where they lived. It is also a door to creating a future where traditional values of Hawaiian people can flourish. (Inscription below the photo on the far left) The Hawaiian people are the real treasures of Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park. Not only will traditional ideas, values, skills, and art forms be preserved, but here they can thrive.

(Inscription below the photo in the center left)
The fishpond walls are tangible..evidence of the connection between people, land, and the sea. Made of stone, built in the ocean; providing for commoner, and chief alike, the fishponds embody the spirit of Hawaii and Hawaiians.

(Inscription below the photo in center right)
Honu (Hawaiian green sea-turtles) rest and feed in the same shallow waters that ancient Hawaiians modified to attract and keep fish. The homi link the ancient Hawaiian concept of machoma-aina (care of the land) to today.

Hanau
Kaloko-Honokohau Park-volcano residue image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 10, 2008
2. Kaloko-Honokohau Park-volcano residue
ka aina, hanau ke alii, hanau ke kanaka Born was the land, born were the chiefs, born were the common people. This Hawaiian proverb speaks of the connection between the land and people. At Kaloko-Honakonau, the land was of special importance to the alii. Perhaps more vividly than anywhere else in Hawaii, here you can see evidence of the lives of both the alii and kanaker, and how they worked, played and interacted on the rugged land they shared.
 
Erected by National Park Service-United States Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 19° 40.716′ N, 156° 1.302′ W. Marker is in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, in Hawaii County. Marker is on Queen Kaahumanu Highway (SR 19). Click for map. The marker is near the Visitor Center. Marker is in this post office area: Kailua Kona HI 96740, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ala Mauka Makai (here, next to this marker); A Sanctuary for Humpback Whales (here, next to this marker); Honokohau Settlement (approx. 0.6 miles away); Hulihe‘e Palace / Moku‘aikaua Church (approx. 3.2 miles away); The First Hawaiian Christian (approx. 3.2 miles away);
The Spirit of Kaloko-Honokohau image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 10, 2008
3. The Spirit of Kaloko-Honokohau
This marker is next to the main marker
Hulihe‘e Palace (approx. 3.3 miles away); Hale Mua (approx. 8.1 miles away); Lonoikamakahiki Residence (approx. 8.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Kailua-Kona.
 
Also see . . .  Kaloko-Honokohau National Historic Park - NPS. (Submitted on March 2, 2014, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Landmarks
 
Building in the shadow of the past image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 10, 2008
4. Building in the shadow of the past
This marker is next to the main marker
Kaloko-Honokohau-graffiti made from clam shells image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 10, 2008
5. Kaloko-Honokohau-graffiti made from clam shells
Kaloko-Honokohau-sign at the entrance image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, November 10, 2008
6. Kaloko-Honokohau-sign at the entrance
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 278 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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