Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Longstreet's Command

Barksdale's Brigade, McLaws’ Division

 
 
Barksdale's Brigade Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 6, 2008
1. Barksdale's Brigade Tablet
Inscription.
C.S.A.
Longstreet's Command.
Barksdale's Brigade, McLaws' Division.

Brig. Gen. William Barksdale, Commanding.
Organization.
13th, 17th, 18th and 21st Mississippi Infantry.
September 17, 1862.

Barksdale's Brigade crossed the Potomac at Blackford's Ford about daybreak of the 17th and halted in the western suburbs of Sharpsburg until nearly 9 a.m. It then advanced to the rising ground southwest of this point and formed line in the left center of McLaws' Division - Kershaw on the right and Semmes on the left. In the general advance of the division it encountered the enemy's line on the edge of the West Woods at this point and, supported by Ransom's Brigade of Walker's Division, forced it back through the woods to the fields beyond, where it was checked by the destructive fire of the Federal artillery and compelled to retire to the protection of the hill and ledges of rock in this vicinity.

Later in the day the brigade re-occupied a portion of the ground from which it had been driven and, with Ransom on the right and Early on the left, held the position until the night of the 18th when it recrossed the Potomac.
 
Erected by Antietam Battlefield Board. (Marker Number 358.)
 
Marker series. This marker
Longstreet's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
2. Longstreet's Command Marker
is included in the Antietam Campaign War Department Markers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 28.657′ N, 77° 45.015′ W. Marker is near Sharpsburg, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Dunker Church Road / Old Hagerstown Pike, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located just west of the parking lot for stop five of the driving tour of Antietam Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Sharpsburg MD 21782, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jackson's Command (within shouting distance of this marker); Brockenbrough’s 2nd Baltimore, Maryland Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Baltimore Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Baltimore Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Onward Rush to Victory or Defeat (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); "Back Boys, For God's Sake Move Back;" (about 300 feet away); John Lemuel Stetson (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Jackson's Command (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Sharpsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. Antietam Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on April 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
Confederate Tablets at the Edge of the West Woods image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Confederate Tablets at the Edge of the West Woods
Tablets for Barksdale's Brigade (left, Number 358) and Early's Brigade (right, Number 379) stand at the eastern edge of the West Woods.
 

2. Barksdale's Brigade, McLaws' Division. Barksdale commanded a brigade of Mississippians. In his official report, he wrote, I at once...advanced upon the enemy, who occupied the woods immediately in front, and from which they had just driven a portion of our forces. In a few moments I engaged them, and, after firing several volleys into their ranks, drove them through the woods and into an open field beyond, and compelled them to abandon their artillery on the hill. At this point I discovered that a very large force of the enemy were attempting to flank me on the left. I therefore ordered the Eighteenth and Thirteenth to wheel in that direction, and not only succeeded in checking the movement they were making, but put them to flight, and pursued them for a considerable distance. As we advanced, the ground was covered with the dead and wounded of the enemy. (Submitted on April 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. William Barksdale. William Barksdale (August 21, 1821 – July 3, 1863) was a lawyer, newspaper editor, U.S. Congressman, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. A staunch secessionist, he was mortally wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg while leading his brigade's attack on Union forces not far from Cemetery Ridge. (Submitted on October 16, 2015, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Longstreet's Command Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 19, 2015
4. Longstreet's Command Marker
 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Brig. General William Barksdale (1821-1863) image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. Brig. General William Barksdale (1821-1863)
At the Battle of Antietam, McLaws's Division defended the West Woods against the assault by Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick's division, saving the Confederate left flank.
Barksdale's Brigade Emerges from the Woods image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
6. Barksdale's Brigade Emerges from the Woods
Looking east from the tablet location. The Dunker Church Road (Old Hagerstown Road) is in the distance over the fold of the ground. Barksdale's Brigade emerged from the woods in this area, crashing into the left flank of the 42nd New York Infantry. With that movement, portions of Dana's Brigade were turned and forced out of the woods.
Barksdale's Brigade Continues to Advance image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 29, 2008
7. Barksdale's Brigade Continues to Advance
Looking north from the tablet location. The Baltimore Battery artillery display is in the foreground. Barksdale's Brigade continued their advance northward, driving the Federals of Sedgwick's Division past D.R. Miller's cornfield. However, as the Confederates entered the open ground, they came under fire from massed Federal batteries on the high ground to the north.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 705 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement