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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Annapolis in Anne Arundel County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sandy Point Farm

William Evans, Soldier and Sailor

 
 
Sandy Point Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By A. Taylor, March 2, 2014
1. Sandy Point Farm Marker
Inscription. William Evans, a slave of Capt. Thomas Mezick, the owner of Sandy Point Farm here, enlisted in the 30th Regiment, United States Colored Troops, in March 1864. The 22-year-old, thereby, gained his freedom. He joined 122 other area slaves who had been inspired by a USCT company camped at St. John's College in nearby Annapolis. Evans transferred to the U.S. Navy on April, 11, 1864. In 1870, he was listed in the census as an Annapolis-area "sailor."

Evans was among many Maryland blacks, slave and free, who fought in the Civil War (8,718 in the USCTs). As a border state, Maryland continued to sanction slavery during the war until a new state constitution abolished it on November 1, 1864. Before then, free blacks could enlist in the U.S. Army, and thousands of slaves fled to seek refuge with the Union troops. By early 1864, however, slaveholders such as Mezick were promised reimbursement for any slaves who enlisted. During the war, Mezick remained at Sandy Point Farm and owned the farm until the late nineteenth century.

(sidebar)
African Americans Faced Brutality

Thomas B. Davis, keeper of Sandy Point Lighthouse, wrote to a Baltimore judge on November 6th, 1984, that on the day Maryland abolished slavery, he saw men on horseback armed with whips and revolvers assaulting African Americans.
Sandy Point Farm Marker with the Sandy Point Lighthouse in the background image. Click for full size.
By A. Taylor, March 2, 2014
2. Sandy Point Farm Marker with the Sandy Point Lighthouse in the background
"They took in the [St. Margaret Postmaster's cellar] a negro Woman stript her and with a Cow Hyde Lasarated her flesh until the Blood oozed from every cut and She within a Month of giving Birth." He documented other incidents involving men, women, and children.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 0.675′ N, 76° 23.852′ W. Marker is near Annapolis, Maryland, in Anne Arundel County. Marker can be reached from South Beach Road 0.8 miles south of Oceanic Drive when traveling south. Click for map. The marker is in Sandy Point State Park, near the beach at the south end of the road, near the main bath house/summer store. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1100 East College Parkway, Annapolis MD 21409, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John Wilkes Booth (here, next to this marker); Tense Time (approx. mile away); Annapolis Laboratory (approx. 4.2 miles away); Fort Nonsense (approx. 4.2 miles away); British Takeover (approx. 4.4 miles away);
Sandy Point State Park image. Click for full size.
By A. Taylor, March 2, 2014
3. Sandy Point State Park
Broad Creek Cemetery (approx. 4.5 miles away); Christ Church (approx. 4.6 miles away); Albert Cabell Ritchie (approx. 4.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Annapolis.
 
Also see . . .
1. MD Civil War Trails for Chesapeake Bay area. (Submitted on March 3, 2014, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland.)
2. Sandy Point State Park (Md DNR website). (Submitted on March 3, 2014, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland.)
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland. This page has been viewed 395 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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