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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Pedro in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Terminal Island Japanese Memorial

 
 
Terminal Island Japanese Memorial: <i>Panel 1</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
1. Terminal Island Japanese Memorial: Panel 1
Inscription.
Panel 1:
Terminal Island Memorial
From the early 1900s until World War II, the fishing village of "Fish Harbor" on Terminal Island was a
thriving community of 3,000 people – primarily Japanese immigrants and their U.S.-born children. The local canneries and fishing boats played a vital role in the American fishing industry. In the village’s neat rows of shops and homes people loved, laughed, worked, played and raised families. On February 25, 1942, all villagers of Japanese descent were given 48 hours to leave Terminal Island. By April the village was gone, homes and livelihoods taken away and villagers sent to internment camps.
- We remember these people, and the community of Terminal Island that was their home.

Panel 2:
The story of Terminal Island is the story of a fishing village, and the Japanese Americans, young and old, who made it their home.
A pre-WWII aerial photo of Terminal Island and close-up photos of two fishermen working on their nets and four young female cannery workers.

Panel 3:
The men fished with poles and nets. Tuna season kept everyone busy in the summer. On dark winter nights, sardines set the ocean aglow.

Panel 4:
Along Tuna Street, the hardware stores, cafes and markets were
<i>Panel 2</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
2. Panel 2
the commercial heart of the village. [Photos: The Hashimoto Co. - The Mio Cafe - The A. Nakamura Grocery store]

Panel 5:
For young girls, Girls' Day was a day to be celebrated, to dress in their kimonos, display their dolls and perform traditional folk dances.
On Boys' Day the symbolic carp flags were flown, and boys displayed their athletic prowess at the annual track meet.

Panel 6:
[Un-captioned photos of boys and their carp flags on Boys' Day, plus adult fishermen and a fish monger with huge tuna hanging on the pier in Fish Harbor.]

Panel 7:
Terminal Islanders both young and old found many ways to relax and have fun. The youth had bonfires on the beach, the men gathered at the harbor after returning from the sea, and families attended social gatherings at the church, temple, school, or Fishermen's Association Hall.

Panel 8:
Terminal Islanders' Reunion - June 1980
 
Erected 1982 by Terminal Islanders Club.
 
Location. 33° 43.83′ N, 118° 16.099′ W. Marker is in San Pedro, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker is on South Seaside Avenue south of Terminal Way, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Terminal Way is accessible from I-110 or
<i>Panel 3</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 19, 2013
3. Panel 3
I-710 via the Seaside Freeway (CA-47), east of the Vincent Thomas Bridge. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1124 South Seaside Avenue, San Pedro CA 90731, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Timms' Point and Landing (approx. 0.4 miles away); Anna Lee Fisher - Astronaut (approx. 0.8 miles away); Municipal Ferry Building - Maritime Museum (approx. 0.8 miles away); World War II Memorial: Propeller from Heavy Cruiser U.S.S. Canberra CA-70/CAG-2 (approx. 0.8 miles away); American Merchant Marine Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away); American Merchant Marine Veterans Memorial Wall of Honor (approx. 0.9 miles away); U.S.S. Los Angeles (approx. 0.9 miles away); Harry Bridges Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Pedro.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Terminal Island Japanese Memorial. (Submitted on July 22, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Terminlal Island Community Images. (Submitted on September 3, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Asian AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, World IIWaterways & Vessels
 
<i>Panel 4</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
4. Panel 4
<i>Panel 5</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
5. Panel 5
<i>Panel 6</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
6. Panel 6
<i>Panel 7</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
7. Panel 7
<i>Panel 8</i> image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
8. Panel 8
Terminal Island Japanese Memorial: <i>Dai Ryu</i> / "Plentiful Fish" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
9. Terminal Island Japanese Memorial: Dai Ryu / "Plentiful Fish"
Note the marker panels (i.e. the etched-in photos) along the memorial's street-side bridge railing - visible beneath the traditional Shinto Torii [gate shrine] with its Japanese kanji-inscribed plaque: "Dai Ryu" (i.e., "Plentiful Fish"). Also, note the acknowledgement plaques (recognizing the memorial's sponsors and major contributors) - along the upper edge of its outer, water-side wall, right-center.
The Fishermen's Monument at the Terminal Island Japanese Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
10. The Fishermen's Monument at the Terminal Island Japanese Memorial
The Fishermen's Monument at the Terminal Island Japanese Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 16, 2013
11. The Fishermen's Monument at the Terminal Island Japanese Memorial
- Henry Alvarez, sculptor.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 706 times since then and 40 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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