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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Southbeach Shoreline – 1852

 
 
Southbeach Shoreline – 1852 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
1. Southbeach Shoreline – 1852 Marker
Inscription.
In 1852 you would have been standing on a bluff overlooking the narrow beach just below that followed the approximate line of King Street. First accurately charted by the U.S. Coast Survey topographical engineers in 1852, the shoreline was named Steamboat Point after the boatyards on the beach. All of the land that you can see on the bay side of King Street is man-made, created by filling the bay. Massive timber cribbing was built to hold large rocks, and thousand of cubic yards of the city’s sandhills and rubble were dumped on top. The construction of the seawall beyond and beneath the foot of King Street and the Embarcadero in 1905 fixed the line of the present shoreline.

“Oh you Saints look don (sic) on the new made town. And tell me, pray, which way to go? Oh the shoreline’s deranged and everything’s changed. Tell me, pray, which way to go?” - South of Market Journal, 1926

 
Erected by San Francisco Art Commission for the Waterfront Transportation Projects.
 
Location. 37° 46.738′ N, 122° 23.462′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is on King Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is
Southbeach Shoreline – 1852 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
2. Southbeach Shoreline – 1852 Marker
The shoreline is marked by a bronze ribbon.
at or near this postal address: 160 King Street, San Francisco CA 94107, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Steamboat Point (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); California Electric Building (about 400 feet away); King Street (about 500 feet away); Rammaytush (approx. 0.2 miles away); Jack London (approx. 0.2 miles away); Chutchui and Sitlintac (approx. 0.2 miles away); Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Francisco.
 
Also see . . .  San Francisco's Changing Shoreline - San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. The discovery of gold at Coloma in 1848 brought people from all over the world into California. Most of them arrived by ship to San Francisco. Passengers and crew alike abandoned ship, as the new “miners” went inland towards the gold fields east of Sacramento. Some abandoned ships were docked and used as stores, like the Niantic, now beneath the Transamerica Building. Other ships became “raw material”—part of the debris and fill used to extend San Francisco’s shoreline. (Submitted on March 24, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.)
Southbeach Shoreline – 1852 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
3. Southbeach Shoreline – 1852 Marker
The shoreline is marked by a bronze ribbon.
 
 
Categories. Natural FeaturesWaterways & Vessels
 
Old shoreline marked at 20 Federal Street image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
4. Old shoreline marked at 20 Federal Street
Federal Street Shoreline plaque image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
5. Federal Street Shoreline plaque
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 463 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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