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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Price in Carbon County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Nine Mile Road

 
 
The Nine Mile Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 14, 2013
1. The Nine Mile Road Marker
Inscription.
The road through Nine Mile Canyon was constructed in 1886 by the Buffalo Soldiers of the U.S. 9th Cavalry to connect Fort Duchesne to the railroad in Carbon County. Most of the stagecoaches, mail and freight passed through Nine Mile into the Uintah Basin, which lead to the development of the canyon and the small town of Harper, presently known as Preston Nutter Ranch. Harperís population peaked by 1910. The arrival of the Uintah railroad rerouted traffic away from the canyon and Harper became a ghost town by the early 1920ís.

ANCIENT AND HONORABLE ORDER
OF
E CLAMPUS VITUS
MATT WARNER CHAPTER
No. 1900
July 9th, 2011
6016, The Year of our Order
 
Erected 2011 by Ancient and Honorable Order of E CLAMPUS VITUS, Matt Warner Chapter. (Marker Number 1900.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Buffalo Soldiers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 35.374′ N, 110° 48.769′ W. Marker is in Price, Utah, in Carbon County. Click for map. Marker is located near the Price River Trail trailhead parking lot. The trailhead parking lot is on the south side of West 6th Street, just west of the intersection with South Carbon Avenue. Marker
The Nine Mile Road Marker (<i>side view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 14, 2013
2. The Nine Mile Road Marker (side view)
The marker faces a large concrete pad, perhaps used for picnic gatherings or meetings. West 6th Street is about 80 feet north of this pad (beyond the left side of this image), and the Price River Trail trailhead parking lot is a short distance east of the pad (visible beyond the upper right corner of this image).
is in this post office area: Price UT 84501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Abraham Powell 1877 Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Harding School (approx. 0.8 miles away); Matt Warner (approx. 6.8 miles away); Carbon Hotel (approx. 6.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The marker is at the entrance to a large concrete pad, about 20ft X 30ft, adjacent to the Price River Trail. The pad is only about 80 feet south of West 6th Street, but the marker is too small and low to be seen clearly from that distance.
 
Also see . . .
1. Nine-Mile Canyon. Nine-Mile Canyon is an outdoor museum. It has some remarkable examples of Indian art and remnants of dwellings that have remained untouched through the centuries. Because of the dry climate and isolation from large population centers or heavy ranching, the canyon remains much as it was hundreds of years ago. The panels of rock art are of such remarkable quality and beauty that they have been featured in National Geographic and other publications highlighting the beauty and uniqueness of the art. (Submitted on April 2, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Nine Mile Canyon.
Price, Utah Centennial Time Capsule image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 14, 2013
3. Price, Utah Centennial Time Capsule
This time capsule, dedicated in 2012 and to be opened 25 years later in 2037, is located at the east edge of the concrete pad.
In the early development of the Uintah Basin of Utah, no road was more important than the Price-Myton road which runs through Nine Mile and Gate Canyons. The road was carved through the rugged canyon by the all-black 9th Cavalry. Nine Mile Road construction coincided with the building of Fort Duchesne on the Uintah frontier in 1886. The road was needed to supply the 300 soldiers garrisoned at Fort Duchesne. Following Indian trails, the road linked the fort with the nearest railhead in Price. For the next quarter-century, the road was the most heavily traveled in eastern Utah. It was the main route for stagecoach, mail, freight and telegraph into Uintah Basin. It was a six-day journey by wagon from Price to Fort Duchesne. (Submitted on April 2, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 355 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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