Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Skagway in Skagway Borough, Alaska — The American West (Northwest)
 

Captain William Moore

The Visionary

 
 
Captain William Moore Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 4, 2009
1. Captain William Moore Marker
Click on photo to view historical photos and to read the inscriptions.
Inscription. Captain William Moore first saw the Skagway River Valley and the White Pass in the spring of 1887 when he came with a Canadian survey team to determine the exact position of the 141st meridian separating Alaska and what is now Canada’s Yukon. He was so impressed that he returned with his son, Ben, in October 1887 to claim a 160-acre homestead in the Skagway valley. The Moores laid a foundation for a cabin and began construction of a wharf before leaving in November for the winter.

A former steamboat captain on the rivers in Alaska and British Columbia, Moore was an adventurer who had taken part in gold stampedes in North and South America. Like many of men already mining in the north, he believed that gold would be found, and had a vision of Skagway---with its deep-water harbor and trail through the White Pass—as the gateway to the north. For the next ten years father and son worked intermittently on improvements to their homestead and wharf. Captain Moore’s dream almost became a nightmare when thousands of stampeders began to arrive on the Skagway beach in July, 1897. Gold had been discovered a year earlier in the Klondike. Many moved on to the gold fields while others stayed to build a new community. They refused to recognize Moore’s homestead claim and litigation began. Eventually the Moores were awarded the land that
Island Princess Cruise Ship-Docked at Skagway image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 4, 2009
2. Island Princess Cruise Ship-Docked at Skagway
their improvements were on plus 25 per cent of the assessed value of the lost property. They continued to own Moore Wharf but later sold it to the White Pass and Yukon Route; it became known as the Railroad Dock.

In 1907 the Moores decided to leave Skagway. For 20 years they had pursued a dream and had lived to see a railroad in Skagway. Captain Moore spent his remaining years in Victoria, British Columbia.
 
Location. 59° 27.014′ N, 135° 19.416′ W. Marker is in Skagway, Alaska, in Skagway Borough. Marker is on Broadway. Click for map. The marker is located at the Port of Skagway south of the Visitors Center. Marker is in this post office area: Skagway AK 99840, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Skagway's Historic Waterfront (a few steps from this marker); Three Thousand Pack Animals (approx. ¼ mile away); Skagway Centennial Statue (approx. ¼ mile away); Skagway and White Pass (approx. ¼ mile away); Inspector Charles Constantine (approx. ¼ mile away); Jeff. Smith’s Parlor (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fatal Duel (approx. 0.3 miles away); Arctic Brotherhood Camp Skagway (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Skagway.
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Klondike Gold Rush NHP Visitor Center in Skagway image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 4, 2009
3. Klondike Gold Rush NHP Visitor Center in Skagway
White Pass-Yukon Railway Depot-Skagway image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 4, 2009
4. White Pass-Yukon Railway Depot-Skagway
White Pass-Yukon Railway Locomotive and Caboose-Skagway image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 4, 2009
5. White Pass-Yukon Railway Locomotive and Caboose-Skagway
Red Onion Saloon in Skagway image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 4, 2009
6. Red Onion Saloon in Skagway
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 336 times since then and 2 times this year. Last updated on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement