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Fort Richardson in Anchorage Borough, Alaska — The American West (Northwest)
 

Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate

 
 
Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 11, 2009
1. Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate Marker
Inscription. This gate is dedicated to men of the Armed Forces of the United States who died while serving their country in war and in peace.---In Memory of Kermit Roosevelt. Born 1859-Died 1943-Who fought in the British and American Armies during World Wars I and II

(bronze plaque below the marker):
Acknowledgement this National Cemetery has been made possible through the cooperation of Eklutna, Inc. in yielding its native claim and legal rights to the land, for this noble and patriotic gesture the veterans administration along with Alaska’s Veterans and their families are most grateful. May 26, 1984.
 
Location. 61° 16.356′ N, 149° 39.504′ W. Marker is in Fort Richardson, Alaska, in Anchorage Borough. Marker is on Davis Highway (Cemetery Entrance). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: JBER AK 99505, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Athabascan Family Lodges and Cabins (approx. 3.3 miles away); Mobile Architecture (approx. 3.3 miles away); Ancient Traditions of the Athabascan People (approx. 3.3 miles away); Raven the Creator (approx. 3.4 miles away).
 
Categories. War, VietnamWar, World IWar, World II
 
Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 11, 2009
2. Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate Marker
Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, March 24, 2008
3. Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate Marker
This marker (In Memory Of) for Kermit Roosevelt is located in Young's Memorial Cemetery, Oyster Bay NY. It is on the lot of President Theodore Roosevelt his father. Fort Richardson National Cemetery Gate is dedicated to Kermit Roosevelt.
Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 11, 2009
4. Fort Richardson National Cemetery-Gate Marker
James L Bondsteel, Vietnam Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient, is buried in Ft. Richardson National Cemetery, Section H, Site 19. MEDAL OF HONOR CITATION-BONDSTEEL, JAMES LEROY Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company A, 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Place and date: An Loc Province, Republic of Vietnam, 24 May 1969. Entered service at: Detroit, Mich. Born: 18 July 1947, Jackson, Mich. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. S/Sgt. Bondsteel distinguished himself while serving as a platoon sergeant with Company A, near the village of Lang Sau. Company A was directed to assist a friendly unit which was endangered by intense fire from a North Vietnamese Battalion located in a heavily fortified base camp. S/Sgt. Bondsteel quickly organized the men of his platoon into effective combat teams and spearheaded the attack by destroying 4 enemy occupied bunkers. He then raced some 200 meters under heavy enemy fire to reach an adjoining platoon which had begun to falter. After rallying this unit and assisting their wounded, S/Sgt. Bondsteel returned to his own sector with critically needed munitions. Without pausing he moved to the forefront and destroyed 4 enemy occupied bunkers and a machine gun which had threatened his advancing platoon. Although painfully wounded by an enemy grenade, S/Sgt. Bondsteel refused medical attention and continued his assault by neutralizing 2 more enemy bunkers nearby. While searching one of these emplacements S/Sgt. Bondsteel narrowly escaped death when an enemy soldier detonated a grenade at close range. Shortly thereafter, he ran to the aid of a severely wounded officer and struck down an enemy soldier who was threatening the officer's life. S/Sgt. Bondsteel then continued to rally his men and led them through the entrenched enemy until his company was relieved. His exemplary leadership and great personal courage throughout the 4-hour battle ensured the success of his own and nearby units, and resulted in the saving of numerous lives of his fellow soldiers. By individual acts of bravery he destroyed 10 enemy bunkers and accounted for a large toll of the enemy, including 2 key enemy commanders. His extraordinary heroism at the risk of his life was in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the U.S. Army.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 623 times since then and 2 times this year. Last updated on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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