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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Critz in Patrick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Reynolds Homestead

 
 
The Reynolds Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
1. The Reynolds Homestead Marker
Inscription. Built by Hardin Reynolds just prior to his marriage in 1843, the house that became known as Rock Spring Plantation, faces the historic Norfolk to Bristol Turnpike. Nearby was the log dwelling of his father, Abram Reynolds, who purchased 50 acres of land and settled here in 1814.

Hardin and his wife, Nancy Jane Cox, had 16 children including Richard Joshua Reynolds, founder of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and A. D. Reynolds whose son, Richard Samuel Reynolds, founded the Reynolds Metals Company.

The house, a state and national historic landmark, has been restored to its 19th century appearance and is open to the public.
 
Location. 36° 38.584′ N, 80° 8.896′ W. Marker is near Critz, Virginia, in Patrick County. Marker is on Homestead Lane west of Abram Penn Highway (County Route 626), on the right. Click for map. Turn right when the house comes into view and you will find the marker is immediately on the right. Marker is in this post office area: Critz VA 24082, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Reynolds Homestead (approx. 3 miles away); Colonel Abram Penn (approx.
The Reynolds Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
2. The Reynolds Homestead Marker
4.2 miles away); Stuart (approx. 6.7 miles away); Blue Ridge Mission School (approx. 8.6 miles away); William Byrdís Survey of 1728 (approx. 10.6 miles away); Fairy Stone State Park (approx. 10.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Virginia Tech - Reynolds Homestead. “The restored Homestead is open for tours Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. During the months of April through October, tours are also available on weekends from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The fee is $5 for adults and $3 for students and children.” (Submitted on April 13, 2014.) 

2. R. J. Reynolds. Wikipedia entry. “Richard Joshua "R. J." Reynolds (July 20, 1850 - July 29, 1918) was an American businessman and founder of the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. The son of a tobacco farmer, he worked for his father and attended Emory and Henry College from 1868 to 1870, eventually graduating from Bryant and Stratton Business College in Baltimore. He sold his share of the family business in 1874 and moved south to Winston-Salem, North Carolina to start his own tobacco company. Reynolds was a savvy businessman and a hard worker, and he quickly became one of the wealthiest citizens of Winston-Salem; eventually, he was the wealthiest person in the state of North Carolina.”
The Reynolds Homestead image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
3. The Reynolds Homestead
(Submitted on April 13, 2014.) 

3. Richard S. Reynolds, Sr. Wukipedia entry. “Shortly after World War I, Reynolds founded the U.S. Foil Company in Louisville, Kentucky. Among the company's early partners were R.J. Reynolds and the British-American Tobacco Company. The company's original business was to roll tin and lead foil for cigarette packaging. Among other innovations, Reynolds devised a moisture-preserving tobacco tin. Later the switch to aluminum foil was made. In 1947, his company introduced Reynolds Wrap. It was sold around the world, it transformed food storage. Reynolds Metals was the second-largest aluminum company in the United States and the third-largest in the world. The Richmond, Virginia, company was bought by ALCOA in 2000.” (Submitted on April 13, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Antebellum South, US
 
The Reynolds Homestead image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
4. The Reynolds Homestead
Tobacco Barn image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
5. Tobacco Barn
The Reynolds Homestead image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
6. The Reynolds Homestead
Half-Log Bench in the Herb Garden image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
7. Half-Log Bench in the Herb Garden
The inscription carved on the bench reads “One of the nicest thing was riding saplings. You go out in the woods or in the edge of the woods and find a sturdy tree that had a young tree growing beside it, and you”d climb up in the sturdy tree and reach out and get hold of the young tree and jump, and it would just let you over to the ground.”
House on the Right, Smokehouse and Ice House on the Left image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
8. House on the Right, Smokehouse and Ice House on the Left
The Gravestone of Richard Samuel Reynolds, Jr. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
9. The Gravestone of Richard Samuel Reynolds, Jr.
“Husband of Virginia Sargeant, son of Julia Louise Parham and Richard Samuel Reynolds. Born May 27, 1908, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Died October 5, 1980, Reynbourne, Richmond, Virgnia.

Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life...
The Gravestone of Julian Sargeant Reynolds image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
10. The Gravestone of Julian Sargeant Reynolds
“June 39, 1936, June 5, 1971. Husband of Mary Ballou Handy, son of Virginia Sargeant and Richard S. Reynolds, Jr. Virginia House of Delegates, 1966–1977, Virginia Senate, 1968–1969, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, 1970–1971. Courage, Humor and Concern Accompanied by Vision.

Ď... while you have the chance in the time of your life, live and enjoy it and add to the beauty and wonderment of the world as we know it.í From an address by Lieutenant Governor Reynolds, June 15, 1970.”
The Reynolds Graveyard Beside the Homestead image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 27, 2013
11. The Reynolds Graveyard Beside the Homestead
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 333 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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