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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cape Canaveral in Brevard County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Launch Complex 34

Friday, 27 January 1967

 

—1831 Hours —

 
Launch Complex 34 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, November 1, 2008
1. Launch Complex 34 Marker
Inscription.
Dedicated to the living memory of the crew of the Apollo 1:

U.S.A.F Lt. Colonel Virgin I. Grissom
U.S.A.F. Lt. Colonel Edward H. White, II
U.S.N. Lt. Commander Roger B. Chaffee


They gave their lives in service to their county in the ongoing exploration of humankind’s final frontier. Remember them not for how they died but for those ideals for which they lived.
 
Location. 28° 31.307′ N, 80° 33.664′ W. Marker is in Cape Canaveral, Florida, in Brevard County. Click for map. The marker is mounted on the Apollo I Launch Pedestal remains at historic Launch Complex 34, Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Marker is in this post office area: Cape Canaveral FL 32920, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Complex 14 (approx. 2.2 miles away); Cape Canaveral Lighthouse (approx. 4.4 miles away); a different marker also named Cape Canaveral Lighthouse (approx. 4.4 miles away); SATAN Tracking Antenna (approx. 7.3 miles away); Port Canaveral Historic Milestones (approx. 8.5 miles away); a different marker also named Port Canaveral Historic Milestones
Launch Complex 34 (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, November 1, 2008
2. Launch Complex 34 (wide view)
Launch pedestal remains on the right and Environmental Control Systems building remains on the left.
(approx. 8.5 miles away); a different marker also named Port Canaveral Historic Milestones (approx. 8.5 miles away); a different marker also named Port Canaveral Historic Milestones (approx. 8.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Cape Canaveral.
 
More about this marker. The Apollo I Launch Pedestal and Launch Complex 34 have been preserved as a permanent memorial for the three astronauts who perished in the January 27, 1967 fire.
 
Also see . . .
1. Disaster on Pad 34.
Tragedy struck on the launch pad during a preflight test for Apollo 204, scheduled to be the first Apollo manned mission. It would have been launched on February 21, 1967, but Astronauts Virgil Grissom, Edward White, and Roger Chaffee lost their lives when a fire swept through the Command Module. (Submitted on April 8, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Complex 34.
On January 27, 1967, a simulated flight was to be performed with the Apollo 204 vehicle, which should have later been launched as Apollo 1. This test, known as an "Overall Test Plugs Out", simulated an actual flight as closely as possible. A countdown would be conducted, all communication and instrumentation systems would be activated, and the umbilical that connected the space vehicle
Launch Complex 34 (<i>launch pedestal</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, November 1, 2008
3. Launch Complex 34 (launch pedestal)
Marker can be seen on the right leg of the pedestal, about 6-foot high.
to the launch pad would be disconnected. The launch vehicle was in place on the launch pad at Complex 34. In the capsule were Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, Edward H. White II, and Roger B. Chaffee. Having entered the capsule after one o'clock P.M., the three were still there at 6:30 P.M. with the countdown stalled at T-10 minutes (communications problems had plagued the test all day). Shortly after 6:30 P.M., disaster struck. A small electrical fire, fed by nylon netting and the 16.2 p.s.i. of pure oxygen in the cabin, reached a blaze. Less than a minute after the initial report of a fire in the capsule, the crew of Apollo 1 was dead. (Submitted on April 8, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Complex 34 launch pedestal.
The most prominent feature of the remains of Complex 34 is the launch pedestal. Made of concrete and steel, it stands 27 feet tall, and is 42 feet long on each side. As seen in the picture above, the top of the pedestal is open to the sky. On the left leg are stenciled the words "ABANDON IN PLACE." On the right leg (and in another location on the structure) are two plaques in memorial to the crew of Apollo 1. Through the legs of the structure, you can see two blast deflectors. (Submitted on April 8, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Launch Complex 34.
The first launch site to be built for
Launch Complex 34 (<i>ECS building wall</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, November 1, 2008
4. Launch Complex 34 (ECS building wall)
One wall remains from the Environmental Control System (ECS) building, beside the launch pedestal on complex 34.
the express purpose of the peaceful exploration of space, Launch Complex 34 required three years from initial concept in September 1958 to her first launch in October 1961.
Although all that remains of her primary features are the launch pad, launch pedestal, blockhouse, a few small walls, and the huge flames deflectors, the spirit of Apollo is alive and vibrant and is located at Launch Complex 34. (Submitted on April 8, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Air & SpaceDisastersExploration
 
Launch Complex 34 (<i>fire ring</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, November 1, 2008
5. Launch Complex 34 (fire ring)
View through launch pedestal fire ring.
Launch Complex 34 (<i>blast deflectors</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, November 1, 2008
6. Launch Complex 34 (blast deflectors)
Charred Apollo blast deflectors, at the north edge of Launch Complex 34.
Launch Complex 34 (<i>blockhouse</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, November 1, 2008
7. Launch Complex 34 (blockhouse)
Launch Complex 34 blockhouse.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 222 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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