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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tecopa in Inyo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

China Ranch

 
 
China Ranch Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
1. China Ranch Marker
Inscription. In the 1890's a Chinese man named Ah Foo came to this canyon from the Borax Works in Death Valley. He developed a successful ranch, raising livestock, hay, fruits and vegetables to help feed the local silver miners and their draft animals. The "China Man's Ranch" became a favorite resting spot, with it's cool running stream and beautiful trees.

In 1900 Ah Foo disappears somewhat mysteriously, though the name has stuck. After many changes of owners and financially unsuccessful ranching attempts over the next 90 years, the current owners began planting young date palms in 1990, and opened China Ranch to the public in 1996. More history and information are available at the gift shop. Enjoy your visit.
 
Erected by China Ranch.
 
Location. 35° 47.996′ N, 116° 11.733′ W. Marker is in Tecopa, California, in Inyo County. Click for map. Markers are located at China Ranch Date Farm. Marker is in this post office area: Tecopa CA 92389, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Salt Creek Hills (approx. 12.1 miles away); Harry Wade Exit Route (approx. 12.7 miles away); Shoshone (approx. 12.8 miles away); Salt Creek (approx. 13.2 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
China Ranch Sign (front) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
2. China Ranch Sign (front)
 The Lone Chinaman of Death Valley. How Ah Foo, driven from the mining camps, built himself a home and defended it with his life. (Submitted on April 17, 2014, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureHorticulture & ForestrySettlements & Settlers
 
China Ranch Sign (rear) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
3. China Ranch Sign (rear)
China Ranch Date Farm image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
4. China Ranch Date Farm
Welcome image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
5. Welcome
Please remember that China Ranch is private property and permission to pass is revocable.
Respect the privacy of our tenants.
Thank you.
A Word About Dates image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
6. A Word About Dates
The date palm is the oldest known cultivated tree crop, dating back to at least 6,000 B.C. in Mesopotamia, or modern day Iraq. Like apples, there are many varieties, and they vary widely in taste, size, color and moisture content. Frequently, cited in both the Bible and the Koran, the date palm has long been considered the tree of life in the middle east. Come in, sample, enjoy!
Dayri (from Iraq) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
7. Dayri (from Iraq)
A drier, chewy date, sweet and often with distinctive purple color. This variety produces large numbers of clones, or offshoots, which can be detached and easily rooted, resulting in an exact genetic copy of the parent tree. Light bearing 100 lbs or less per season.
Khadrawy (from Iraq) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
8. Khadrawy (from Iraq)
A round dark brown date, very soft and sweet with excellent flavor. This is also the slowest vertically growing variety of commercial date palms. Yields 150 lbs. per season.
China Ranch Hybrids image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
9. China Ranch Hybrids
These are offshoots, or clones from the best fruit varieties out of the original grove. Since the parent trees wwere planted from seeds they are unknown, original types and we are propagating the best of them. Yield varies greatly, from less than 100 lbs. to more than 300 lbs. per season.
Halaway (from Iraq) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
10. Halaway (from Iraq)
A soft, almost blonde colored date with an excellent flavor. Notice how these trees tend to be thicker and more massive than some of the neighboring varieties. Tree size and growth patterns can vary widely, although all date palms are in the sam genus and species, Phoenix dactyliferia.
Seep Willow (Baccaris sergiloides) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
11. Seep Willow (Baccaris sergiloides)
A member of the diverse sun flower family, this riparian shrub rows as far souh as Honduras. In the spring and summer its flowers provide a good food source for bees and other insects.
Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremontii) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
12. Fremont Cottonwood (Populus fremontii)
An indicator of close surface water, cottonwoods often form the top of the riparian canopy in moist desert canyons, providing shelter for many birds, insects and animals. Named in honor of western explorer John C. Fremont, who was here in the Spring of 1843.
Wildlife Sign image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
13. Wildlife Sign
15 varieties of lizards, 20 types of snakes, and over 120 species of birds have been identified here. Enoy the wildlife!
Yerba Mansa (Anemopsis Californica) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
14. Yerba Mansa (Anemopsis Californica)
A natural antiseptic which grows only in swampy areas, this plant is still used to treat exernal wounds and blisters. it has a strong and distinctive medicinal odor when crushed.
Screwbean Mesquite (Prosopis pubescens) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
15. Screwbean Mesquite (Prosopis pubescens)
The coiled bean pods make this mesquite easy to recognize. It was a good food source and the wood was used to make many tools such as awls, bowls, trays, war clubs, cradles, and more.
Wildlife Sign image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
16. Wildlife Sign
A study was done in 1972 was not able to identify the genus or species of the crayfish which inhabits the stream.
The Nevada Speckled Dace (Rhinichthys Osculus) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
17. The Nevada Speckled Dace (Rhinichthys Osculus)
is a small native fish that inhabits the stream. The are omnivourous, feeding on algae, insects and larva.
Honey Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
18. Honey Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa)
Native Americans throughout the Southwest used every part of this tree, from the sugar and protein beans to the fibrous roots. The hard wood is an excellent fuel and tool material, and the black pitch was used as a medicinal tea, hair dye, and pottery paint.
Gooding Willow (Salix goodingii) image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
19. Gooding Willow (Salix goodingii)
Containing a natural painkiller, willow was the source from which aspirin, acetylealiclic acid, was first synthesized.
China Ranch Gift Shop & Bakery image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
20. China Ranch Gift Shop & Bakery
China Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
21. China Ranch
China Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
22. China Ranch
Date Palms image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
23. Date Palms
Thermometer image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
24. Thermometer
China Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
25. China Ranch
Dates image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
26. Dates
Dates image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
27. Dates
China Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
28. China Ranch
China Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
29. China Ranch
Dates image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
30. Dates
Nature Trail image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
31. Nature Trail
Nature Trail image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
32. Nature Trail
China Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
33. China Ranch
China Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 10, 2009
34. China Ranch
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. This page has been viewed 275 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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