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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Honolulu in Honolulu County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Kălia Fishponds

Diamond Head from Waikiki Annex Pond

 

—Waikiki Historic Trail —

 
Kălia Fishponds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 15, 2014
1. Kălia Fishponds Marker
Photo Captions:
World War 11, cottages sat along Ft. DeRussy's quiet tree lined street.
Second photo caption: The Kalia area once contained abundant inland fishponds.
Third photo caption: After dredging the ocean bottom for landfill, a good swimming beach was created at Ft. DeRussy that is still enjoyed today. The old diving platforms, however has since been torn down.
Inscription. Had you walked across this road in 1897 you might have landed in Waikĩkĩ’s largest fishpond, the Ka’ihikapu, which measured 13 acres. All of today’s Fort DeRussy on the mauka (toward the mountain) side of the road was covered with fishponds. There were actually hundreds of fishponds in Waikĩkĩ. The fishponds were controlled by the chiefs, but maintained by the commoners. The fish grown in the ponds were mostly ‘ama’ama (or mullet) and awa (milkfish), both of which adapted well to brackish water. When the ponds were well cared for, the fish fattened quickly. The ponds functioned as “royal iceboxes” with readily available food for quests, especially the unexpected.

Ancient Hawaiians believed their fishponds were inhabited by mo’o deities who were sometimes described as creatures with terrifying black bodies, 12 to 30 feet in length. Hawaiians believed these creatures were the guardian spirits of fish ponds, who not only protected the caretakers but punished those who abused their responsibilities. The reclamation of Waikĩkĩ began here in Kălia when the U.S. military acquired 72 acres of land and started draining it in 1908 to build Fort DeRussy. It took over 250,000 cubic yards of sand and coral dredged from various O’ahu areas continuously over the course of a year to cover Ka’ihikapua
Kălia Fishponds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 15, 2014
2. Kălia Fishponds Marker
and its sister ponds in Kălia. The Hale Koa Hotel is used exclusively for U.S. military personnel and their dependents.
 
Erected by Vision Team of Kaphula, Diamond Head, and Waikiki. (Marker Number 15.)
 
Location. 21° 16.885′ N, 157° 50.004′ W. Marker is in Honolulu, Hawaii, in Honolulu County. Marker is on Kaila Road, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2076 Kalia Road, Honolulu HI 96815, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kuroda Field (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); “Brothers in Valor” Memorial (about 700 feet away); U.S. Prefabricated Pill Box (approx. 0.2 miles away); U.S. Light Tank, M24 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Monarchy Cannon (approx. 0.2 miles away); Japanese Light Tank (approx. 0.2 miles away); U.S. 105mm Howitzer M3 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Japanese Type 1 (1941) (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Honolulu.
 
Also see . . .  Waikiki Historic Trail Tour. (Submitted on April 21, 2014, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California.)
 
Categories. Environment
 
Kălia Fishponds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 15, 2014
3. Kălia Fishponds Marker
Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva) image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 15, 2014
4. Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva)
Indian Bayan Tree image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 15, 2014
5. Indian Bayan Tree
Located in Ft. DeRussy Park
Ohai~Monkey Pod Trees image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, April 15, 2014
6. Ohai~Monkey Pod Trees
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 317 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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