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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Andersonville in Sumter County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

National Prisoner of War Museum

 
 
National Prisoner of War Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, April 7, 2014
1. National Prisoner of War Museum Marker
Inscription.
This building is a memorial to all Americans held as prisoners of war. Through exhibits and video presentations the museum is a reminder that American's freedoms can come at great cost.

The museum's architecture is not based on a specific place but is meant to evoke prison guard towers and stockades in general. Development of this landmark resulted from a partnership of many different individuals and groups, including the American Ex-Prisoner of War and the Friends of Andersonville.

The People of Georgia, through the Department of Transportation and the General Assembly, supported this Memorial by building the entrance road and parking lot.

The American Ex-Prisoners of War, originally founded in 1942, have adopted this museum as a repository of historic objects connected with their story.

In 1904 the United States Mint produced a commemorative coin that funded a substantial portion of the Museum's costs. The eagle in flight with a broken shackle and chain is a universal POW symbol.

Photo Insert
Union prisoners at Camp Fort in Tyler, Texas.
 
Location. 32° 11.868′ N, 84° 7.607′ W. Marker is in Andersonville, Georgia, in Sumter County. Marker is on POW Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Andersonville GA 31711, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
National Prisoner of War Museum image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, April 7, 2014
2. National Prisoner of War Museum
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battling Bastards of Bataan (within shouting distance of this marker); Memorial to POW’s at Hiroshima Japan (within shouting distance of this marker); Memorial to American Former Prisoners of War Stalag XVII-B (within shouting distance of this marker); This Was Andersonville (within shouting distance of this marker); Earthwork Defenses (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Monuments and Memories (about 600 feet away); The Expanded Stockade (about 600 feet away); Shebangs (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Andersonville.
 
Categories. Military
 
National Prisoner of War Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
3. National Prisoner of War Museum Marker
National Prisoner of War Museum Display image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
4. National Prisoner of War Museum Display
Located inside the museum.
National Prisoner of War Museum Display image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
5. National Prisoner of War Museum Display
Located inside the museum.
National Prisoner of War Museum Display image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
6. National Prisoner of War Museum Display
Located inside the museum.
National Prisoner of War Museum Display image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
7. National Prisoner of War Museum Display
Located inside the museum.
National Prisoner of War Museum Display image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
8. National Prisoner of War Museum Display
Located inside the museum.
National Prisoner of War Museum Sign image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
9. National Prisoner of War Museum Sign
Located inside the museum.
National Prisoner of War Fountain image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
10. National Prisoner of War Fountain
Located at the back exit of the museum.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 258 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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