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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Boston in Suffolk County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Lafayette Mall

 
 
The Lafayette Mall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson
1. The Lafayette Mall Marker
Inscription. This mall is named in honor of Marquis de Lafayette distinguished French soldier Major-General in the War of American Independence and illustrious patriot of the French Revolution who nobly served the cause of liberty on two continents invited by act of Congress to revisit the United States as a guest of the nation in 1824 He was welcomed with signal honor as he passed along this mall.

Erected by the city of Boston 1924 He laid the corner-stone of Bunker Hill Monument June 17, 1825

"Heaven saw fit to ordain that the electric spark of liberty should be conducted through you from the New World to the Old"
 
Erected 1924 by City of Boston.
 
Location. 42° 21.343′ N, 71° 3.772′ W. Marker is in Boston, Massachusetts, in Suffolk County. Marker is on Tremont Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. This simple memorial to Marquis de Lafayette, is located in Parkman Plaza, part of the Boston Common. Marker is in this post office area: Boston MA 02108, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Commodore John Barry (within shouting distance of this marker); Power System of Bostonís Rapid Transit (about 300 feet away, measured
The Lafayette Mall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson
2. The Lafayette Mall Marker
in a direct line); Boston Common (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Boston Common (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Boston Common (about 400 feet away); Park Street Church (about 400 feet away); Tragic Events (about 600 feet away); James Otis (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Boston.
 
More about this marker. This bronze plaque was designed by John Francis Paramino, 1888/89-1956, sculptor and created by the Gorham Manufacturing Company foundry. It bears the likeness of Lafayette in relief.
 
Regarding The Lafayette Mall. Lafayette was just nineteen when he presented himself for service in the cause of the American Revolution in 1777. First refused by the Continental Congress, he became a close friend of General George Washington, upon recommendation of Benjamin Franklin. Eventually Lafayetee did command American forces against the British and the Hessians, gaining alliances among the Oneida Tribe, and successfully recruiting further military commitments from the French.
The Lafayette Mall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson
3. The Lafayette Mall Marker
Among his most significant battles was the Siege of Yorktown which resulted in the surrender of Gen. Cornwallis.

After the war, Lafayette returned to France where he became a leading figure in the French Revolution and national politics. At one point he declined an offer to become the dictator of France. He forever remained an advocate of universal abolition of slavery and a champion of liberty everywhere.

Subsequent trips to the United States brought him enthusiastic receptions and honors. Honorary degrees, towns named in his honor, and honorary U.S. citizenship for him and his heirs.

When he died in Paris on May 20, 1834, this orphan from a wealthy aristocratic family, was buried under soil from Bunker Hill, gathered by his son, Georges Washington Lafayette.
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
The Lafayette Mall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson
4. The Lafayette Mall Marker
Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Larry Wilson of Wareham, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 232 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Larry Wilson of Wareham, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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