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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Williamstown in Wood County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Henderson Hall

Holding Firm for the Union

 
 
Henderson Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
1. Henderson Hall Marker
Inscription. This was the home of George Washington Henderson, a prominent Wood County resident, slaveholder, and participant in the West Virginia statehood movement during the Civil War. Henderson served as a member of the countyís contingent to the convention that met in Wheeling on May 13-15, 1861, a month after Virginia seceded from the Union, to begin the process that eventually separated northwestern Virginia from the rest of the state. Later, Henderson was elected to the legislature of the Restored Government of Virginia, serving from 1861 until the new state was admitted to the Union on June 20, 1863.

Part of a February 1861 letter from Arthur I. Boreman, later the first governor of West Virginia, likely expressed Hendersonís own feelings about the imminent division of the nation: “Why should we risk a new government in the south when we are already governed by the best constitution ever and God given freedoms which might disappear under a new government after secession?”

Located on the main road between Marietta, Ohio, and Parkersburg, West Virginia, Henderson Hall lay in the path of Union troops moving overland when the Ohio River was unsuitable for transportation. After arriving in Marietta by train, the men marching down the road to Parkersburg frequently camped hereto rest, drill, and conduct artillery
Henderson Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
2. Henderson Hall Marker
practice. Hendersonís well-known support of the Union probably saved his house and farm from plundering by passing soldiers.

(sidebar)
George Washington Henderson built Henderson Hall in two construction campaigns after his marriage in 1826 to Elizabeth Ann Tomlinson. The first section of the house, built about 1836, now appears as a rear addition to the grand Italianate-style mansion before you. Henderson hired architect and master builder John M. Slocomb of Marietta, Ohio, to design and construct this part of the dwelling between 1856 and 1859. An important and rare example of the style (the Greek Revival was more popular at the time), the house is as notable for its interior finishes as for its exterior. In addition, not only the Henderson furnishings but also the family papers have survived, including those of the statehood period. The mansion and its outbuildings were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Henderson Hall is open to the public.

(captions)
(lower left) Henderson Hall ca. 1880 — Courtesy Henderson Hall Plantation
(upper right) George Washington Henderson — Courtesy Henderson Hall Plantation
Certification of Hendersonís election to Restored Government of Virginia General Assembly, October 29, 1861 — Courtesy Henderson Hall Plantation
 
Erected by
Henderson Hall image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
3. Henderson Hall
West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 39° 22.705′ N, 81° 28.857′ W. Marker is in Williamstown, West Virginia, in Wood County. Marker is at the intersection of River Road and Williams Highway (West Virginia Route 14), on the left when traveling south on River Road. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 517 River Road, Williamstown WV 26187, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Commandant Archbold Henderson (a few steps from this marker); Tomlinson Mansion (approx. 1.8 miles away); Williamstown (approx. 2.3 miles away); Celoron de Blainville (approx. 2.3 miles away in Ohio); Fort Harmar (approx. 2.5 miles away in Ohio); Site of the United States Fort Harmar (approx. 2.5 miles away in Ohio); Lewis and Clark Expedition / Letter to the President (approx. 2.5 miles away in Ohio); Pioneer Marietta (approx. 2.7 miles away in Ohio). Click for a list of all markers in Williamstown.
 
Also see . . .  Henderson Hall Historic District. Wikipedia (Submitted on May 8, 2014.) 
 
Categories. PoliticsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Henderson Hall image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
4. Henderson Hall
Henderson Hall Exhibit image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
5. Henderson Hall Exhibit
Henderson Hall Outbuildings image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
6. Henderson Hall Outbuildings
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 233 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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