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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Parkersburg in Wood County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Creating West Virginia

Parkersburg's Wartime Politicians

 
 
Creating West Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
1. Creating West Virginia Marker
Inscription. During the Civil War, several Parkersburg residents played a role in carving the new state of West Virginia from the Old Dominion of Virginia and in representing it at the national level.

Much of the political life of the city took place in nearby venues such as the U.S. Hotel, which stood just southeast of here, the courthouse that stood on the site of the present structure a block farther southeast, and the Swann House, which was located on “The Point” three blocks southwest. Wartime visitors to the Swann House, the most prominent hotel in the city, included Union Gens. George B. McClellan, Jacob D. Cox, Ambrose E. Burnside, and David Hunter, and Union Cols. Rutherford B. Hayes and James A. Garfield.

Prominent Parkersburg residents were motivated to keep northwestern Virginia in the Union and to help protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the oilfield at Burning Springs (Oiltown). Peter G. Van Winkle contributed importantly to drafting the first constitution for the new state of West Virginia and served as one of its first two U.S. senators. Local attorney Arthur I. Boreman became the state’s first governor. William E. Stevenson served in the first state constitutional convention and then became the state’s third governor. Physician John W. Moss presided over the First Wheeling Convention and later
Close up of the map of Parkersburg in the upper right image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
2. Close up of the map of Parkersburg in the upper right
served as colonel of the 2nd West Virginia Infantry (US). Gen. John Jay Jackson, as a delegate to Virginia’s secession convention, voted against secession. His son, Judge John Jay Jackson, served as a federal judge and delegate to the First Wheeling Convention.

(captions)
(lower left) Congressman Peter G. Van Winkle Courtesy Library of Congress; Governor Arthur I. Boreman Courtesy of Library of Congress; Governor William E. Stevenson West Virginia Archives and History
(upper right) Central Parkersburg, M. Wood White's County and District Map of the State of West Virginia (1873)
 
Erected by West Virignia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 15.936′ N, 81° 33.816′ W. Marker is in Parkersburg, West Virginia, in Wood County. Marker is at the intersection of 3rd Street and Juliana Street (West Virginia Route 68), on the right when traveling north on 3rd Street. Click for map. This marker is on the grounds of the Oil & Gas Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 119 3rd Street, Parkersburg WV 26101, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. W.H. Smith Hardward Co (within shouting
Creating West Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
3. Creating West Virginia Marker
distance of this marker); Wood County Court House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); West Virginia's First Governor / Parkersburg Governors (about 500 feet away); Historic Blennerhassett Hotel (about 600 feet away); Escape to Freedom (about 600 feet away); Vital Transportation Center (about 700 feet away); Parkersburg (about 700 feet away); Railroads (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Parkersburg.
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, US Civil
 
Creating West Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 13, 2014
4. Creating West Virginia Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 188 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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