Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cherokee in Swain County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Trail of Tears

Qualla Town

 
 
Trail of Tears - Qualla Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 23, 2014
1. Trail of Tears - Qualla Town Marker
Inscription. In 1838, the United States government deported more than 16,000 Cherokee Indian people from their homelands in Tennessee, Alabama, North Carolina and Georgia, and sent them to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Thousands of Cherokees perished during the forced relocation, which has become known as the Trail of Tears. This tragic episode of our history was a result of the 1830 Indian Removal Act, an official government policy to purge native nations from the eastern United States.

Because the Cherokee community of Qualla Town separated from the Cherokee Nation around 1820, the people of Qualla were not legally required to emigrate on the Trail of Tears to Oklahoma in 1838. By 1837, WIlliam H. Thomas, Qualla's white patron, secured state and federal guarantees for the “Qualla Town Cherokees” right to remain in their ancient homeland.

Nevertheless, the U.S. Army threatened the people of Qualla with deportation in September 1838, when troops commanded by Lt. C.H. Larned came to Qualla in search of fugitives from the Cherokee Nation. Larned directed Yonaguska, the leader of the settlement, to assemble the community for inspection.

The troops counted the Qualla Town people against an 1837 roster to determine if any fugitives were present. Larned then demanded that Yonaguska send Qualla scouts to find
Trail of Tears - Qualla Town Marker (Closeup left side) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 23, 2014
2. Trail of Tears - Qualla Town Marker (Closeup left side)
their own kinspeole who were hiding in the mountains, and threatened to deport the Qualla community if they did not cooperate. The conscripted Qualla scouts led the troops on wild goose chases through the Smokey Mountains, far from the hiding places of the fugitives.

After the army withdrew from western North Carolina in November 1838, hundreds of Cherokee fugitives came from their mountain hideouts and joined friends and relatives at Qualla Town, forming the nucleus of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.
 
Erected by the North Carolina Chapter of the Trail of Tears Association.
 
Location. 35° 29.07′ N, 83° 18.948′ W. Marker is in Cherokee, North Carolina, in Swain County. Marker is at the intersection of Tsali Boulevard (U.S. 441) and Drama Road, on the left when traveling north on Tsali Boulevard. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 589 Tsali Blvd, Cherokee NC 28719, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sequoyah (within shouting distance of this marker); Long Hair Clan (approx. 0.2 miles away); Cherokee Veterans Park (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nimrod Jarrett Smith (approx. 0.2
Trail of Tears - Qualla Town Marker (Right Side) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 23, 2014
3. Trail of Tears - Qualla Town Marker (Right Side)
When the army came to Qualla in October 1838, the troops forced the community to assemble for inspection. Lt. Larned counted Qualla Town residents against an 1837 roster.
miles away); Oconaluftee Indian Village (approx. 0.4 miles away); Thomas's Legion (approx. 0.9 miles away); Place of the Poplar Boundary Tree (approx. 1.1 miles away); Sorghum Mill and Furnace (approx. 2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Cherokee.
 
More about this marker. Located near the sidewalk at the Museum of the Cherokee Indian.
 
Also see . . .  North Carolina Chapter Trail of Tears Association. (Submitted on May 23, 2014, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
Trail of Tears - Qualla Town Marker (On left in front of black bear) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 23, 2014
4. Trail of Tears - Qualla Town Marker (On left in front of black bear)
Marker located at this museum. (In front of this sign) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 23, 2014
5. Marker located at this museum. (In front of this sign)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 284 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement