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Abbeville in Abbeville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Last Cabinet Meeting Marker

 
 
Last Cabinet Meeting Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
1. Last Cabinet Meeting Marker
Inscription.
This tablet was placed here
to commemorate
the last meeting of the
Confederate States Cabinet
which was held in the Burt House near by
directly in front of this stone.

The following cabinet members were present:
Jefferson Davis, President
Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State
John C. Breckenridge, Secretary of War
S.R. Mallory, Secretary of Navy
John H. Reagan, Post Master Gen'l
----------
A council of war was held at the same
time with the cabinet and the following
generals were in attendance:
W.C. Breckenridge, Geo. G. Dibrell
Basil W. Duke, S.W. Ferguson
J.C. Vaughn, Braxton Bragg
----------
It was decided after mature deliberation
and discussion that it was useless to
continue the war longer and that the
government should be disbanded.
----------
M.H. Clarke acting treasurer, Confederate
States of America says: The last cabinet
meeting, which could be called such, was
held at Abbeville, on the 2nd day of May,
1865.
----------
A full history of these events may
be found in the office of the Clerk of
Court of Abbeville County.

 
Erected 1921 by Civil Club.
 
Location.
Last Cabinet Meeting Marker<br>Northwest Side image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
2. Last Cabinet Meeting Marker
Northwest Side
34° 10.8′ N, 82° 22.883′ W. Marker is in Abbeville, South Carolina, in Abbeville County. Marker is on North Main Street. Click for map. Marker is located at the intersection of North Main and Greenville Streets, between the First Baptist Church and Main Street United Methodist Church. Marker is in this post office area: Abbeville SC 29620, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House (a few steps from this marker); The Bundy-Barksdale-McGowan House (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); Burt-Stark House / Jefferson Davis’s Flight (within shouting distance of this marker); Maj. Thomas D. Howie (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Abbeville's Confederate Colonels (about 700 feet away); Thomas Chiles Perrin House (about 800 feet away); The Old Livery Stable (approx. 0.2 miles away); Major Thomas Dry Howie (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Abbeville.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Abbeville is one of several places claiming to be the site of the last cabinet meeting. This list shows the other "last meetings", including one which occurred two days after Abbeville's.
 
Also see . . .
1. Jefferson Davis.
Last Cabinet Meeting Marker<br>Southeast Side image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
3. Last Cabinet Meeting Marker
Southeast Side
The Confederate States of America:
22 February, 1862
Deo Vindice
(God will judge)
Jefferson Finis Davis (June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889) was an American politician who served as President of the Confederate States of America for its entire history from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Judah P. Benjamin. Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. John C. Breckinridge. John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821 – May 17, 1875) was a lawyer, U.S. Representative, Senator from Kentucky, Vice President of the United States, Southern Democratic candidate for President in 1860, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the last Confederate Secretary of War. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Stephen Mallory. Stephen Russell Mallory (1813 – November 9, 1873) was a United States politician and the Confederate Secretary of the Navy during the American Civil War. (Submitted on December 27, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. New York Times Article, September 26, 1867. S.R. Mallory Pardoned by the President (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. John Henniger Reagan. John Henninger Reagan
Last Cabinet Meeting Marker<br>with Civil War Era Artillery image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
4. Last Cabinet Meeting Marker
with Civil War Era Artillery
North Main Street is in the background; Greenville Street is in the foreground.
(October 8, 1818 – March 6, 1905), was a leading 19th century American politician from the U.S. state of Texas. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. William Campbell Preston Breckinridge. William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (August 28, 1837 - November 18, 1904) was a Democratic U.S. Representative from Kentucky, a Member of the Freemasons, and a Member of the Knights Templar. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. George Gibbs Dibrell. George Gibbs Dibrell (April 12, 1822 – May 9, 1888) was an American lawyer and a five-term member of the United States House of Representatives from the 3rd Congressional District of Tennessee. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Basil W. Duke. Basil Wilson Duke (May 28, 1838 – September 16, 1916) was a Confederate general officer during the American Civil War, most noted for his service as a brigade commander in 1863's Morgan's Raid; Duke would later wrote a popular account of this raid. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. Samuel W. Ferguson. Samuel Wragg Ferguson (November 3, 1834 – February 3, 1917) was a career United States Army officer, a cavalryman, and a graduate of West Point. (Submitted on November 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Burt-Stark House from Confederate States Cabinet Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
5. Burt-Stark House from Confederate States Cabinet Marker
 

11. General John Crawford Vaughn. He was in Charleston, South Carolina on a business trip on 12 April 1861 when General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard fired on Fort Summer. (Submitted on November 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

12. The Last Confederate General: John C. Vaughn and his East Tennessee Cavalry. John Crawford Vaughn seems to have been just about everywhere during the war, although his military record was not that impressive. (Submitted on November 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

13. Braxton Bragg. Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career United States Army officer, and then a General in the Confederate States Army, a principal commander in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

14. Cabinet of the Confederate States of America. Original members: Attorney-General Benjamin, Secretary of State Mallory, Secretary Memminger, Vice-President Stephens, Secretary Walker, President Jefferson Davis, Postmaster Reagan, and Secretary Toombs. (Submitted on October 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

15. The True Story Of The Capture Of Jefferson Davis by Major W.T. Walthall, (Late A.A.G., Confederate. The publication, in the Philadelphia Weekly Times
The Last Council of War Meeting of Confederate President Jefferson Davis with his Military Advisors image. Click for full size.
By Wilber George Kurtz
6. The Last Council of War Meeting of Confederate President Jefferson Davis with his Military Advisors
One of a series of paintings by artist Wilbur George Kurtz depicting key events in the history of Abbeville. The table shown in the painting is one of the few items from the Burt era still in the Burt-Stark house. Also present is the bed in which Davis spent the night.
of July 7th, 1877, of an article by Major General James H. Wilson, professing to give an account of the capture of the Confederate President in 1865, has not only revived a fictitious story circulated soon after that event occurred -- perhaps still current among the vulgar, though long since refuted -- but has surrounded it with a cluster of new embellishments, which had heretofore been either "unwritten history" or unimagined fiction. (Submitted on May 5, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Jefferson Davis Left Mark on Abbeville's History
Jefferson Davis Left Mark on Abbeville's History
By Matt Rogers
Greenville Index-Journal

Abbeville — The president of the Confederate States of America made his historical mark on this town in just one day, but it will live on indefinitely.

According to various historical accounts, Jefferson Davis spent the night of May 1, 1865 in Cokesbury, now in Greenwood County, at Gen. Martin Witherspoon Gary’s home. Then he continued his journey to Abbeville where he spent the next night at the home of Col. Armistead Burt.

Davis arrived in Abbeville at about 10 a.m. six days after Gen. Robert E. Lee had urged the evaluation of the
Jefferson Davis<br>June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889 image. Click for full size.
By Matthew Brady
7. Jefferson Davis
June 3, 1808 – December 6, 1889
U.S. Rep. from Miss 1845–1846
U.S. Sen. from Miss. 1847-1851, 1857-1861
U.S. Sec. of War 1853-1857
President of the C.S.A 1861-1865
disbanding capital of Richmond and Gen. Joseph E. Johnston had surrendered to Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman at Greensboro, N.C. He would stay in the town at the Burt home until midnight.

By about 4 p.m., Davis met with Confederate Secretary of War Gens. John C. Breckinridge, Braxton Bragg and five brigade generals at the Burt home. It had the trappings of a council of war.

An observer said as Davis came near Marshall House corner in town, some residents and furloughed soldiers, “…raised their hats and gave a single cheer. Davis’s only recognition was the raising of his own hat.

His face betrayed the deep feeling and extreme anxiety which he felt for the safety of the government.

The army officers at the meeting told Davis that their soldiers could not fight in the Abbeville area. Brig. Gen. S. W. Ferguson said about 100 of his men perhaps would fight.

Gen. George G. Dibrell said he could not count on any men in his brigade “…except to save Mr. Davis and Gen. Breckinridge and every hour was diminishing his hold upon them, and I have heard that he declared, almost with tears, that he would not risk another life among his noble men except for that purpose, that the cause of the Confederacy was lost, and his duty now was to take care of his men,” said an account in the Abbeville Press & Banner.

Brig. Gen.
Judah P. Benjamin<br>August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884 image. Click for full size.
By Matthew Brady
8. Judah P. Benjamin
August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884
C.S.A. Att. Gen. 1861-1861
C.S.A. Sec. of War 1861-1862
C.S.A. Sec. of State 1862-1865
Basil W. Duke said about 150 soldiers would fight under him and that the war might not be lost if commanders would inspire the men under their commands.

Col William C. P. Breckinridge said he would not surrender unless he was ordered to, but the soldiers under him might not feel the same way.

Gen. John C. Vaughn said he and the men under him would “…accept whatever terms Gen. Johnston had; which was then not known to us.”

Davis said he did not think it would be wise to have armed men “…who would not fight…,” that it was a crime to make the men who would fight to risk their lives and that the command of these men must be dissolved.

Davis assumed that Johnston had already surrendered, which might make the only commanders left were those now at his side.

Though the war was lost, Davis continued to hold out hope. His feelings were that “…the blood shed during four years was not shed in vain, and under other auspices and abler leaders, would yet succeed.”

Capt William Hawar Parker was one of the officers who was in control of the Confederate government’s “treasure train.” He was also a midshipman escort for the train. In his book “Recollections of a Naval Officer,” Parker described what he encountered while travelling to Abbeville.

Parker came to Abbeville on
John C. Breckinridge<br>January 16, 1821 – May 17, 1875 image. Click for full size.
By Matthew Brady
9. John C. Breckinridge
January 16, 1821 – May 17, 1875
U.S. Rep. from Ken. 1851-1855
V.P. of the U.S. 1857-1861
U.S. Sen. from Ken. 1861-1861
C.S.A. Sec. of War 1865
April 28, 1865, where he placed the money “…in a warehouse on the public square,” which was guarded.

When Davis arrived, Parker said its residents welcomed the party. Those soldiers who traveled with the president were only doing so, Parker believed, so that they could receive food.

Parker described Davis “…as a slender man, of about 5 feet 10 inches in height, and with a grey eye as his most marked feature…His air was resolute; and he looked, as he is, a born leader of men….”

Parker told Davis he would be captured if he stayed in Abbeville. “You have only a few demoralized soldiers, and a train of camp followers three miles long. You will be captured, and you know how we will feel about that.

“It is your duty to the Southern people not to allow yourself to be made a prisoner. Leave now with a few followers and cross the Mississippi, as you express a desire to eventually, and there again raise the standard.”

Between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m., Parker again implored Davis to leave town. He asked Davis if he would leave with an escort of “…four naval officers, (of whom I was to be one)….”

These officers would take him to the Florida east coast. With these officers, Davis could possibly get a boat that could in turn take him to the Bahamas or Cuba. Davis, however, declined the offer.
Samuel R. Mallory<br>1813 – November 9, 1873 image. Click for full size.
By Unknown Source
10. Samuel R. Mallory
1813 – November 9, 1873
C.S.A. Sec. of the Navy 1861-1865


Parker was later told that Davis and his party would leave that night. All of the men had horses for their journey. However, Parker did not and when he was unable to obtain a horse, he declined to go with them.

By midnight, Davis and his party resumed their flight and eventually came to “the house of the Rev. J.O. Lindsay, D.D., near Mt. Carmel,” where his wife was.
The Davis’s then continued travelling, now into Georgia. By May 10, Davis was captured by Union Calvary in Irwinville, Ga.

Burt bought his Abbeville home in 1862. By 1868 however, the home was sold. James Samuel Stark bought the home in 1900. In 1971, his daughter, Mary Stark Davis, gave the house, and later the contents, to the Abbeville County Historical Preservation Commission.

The Burt-Stark Mansion is located at 400 N. Main St. in Abbeville. During the winter it is open on Friday and Saturday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. It is also open by special appointment if people call 459-4297.

In the summer months, from May through Sept, the mansion is open Tuesday through Saturday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
    — Submitted November 15, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Last Cabinet Meeting Marker
Mrs. Foster B. McLane, Mrs. Frank Gary, and Mrs. William
John H. Reagan<br>October 8, 1818 – March 6, 1905 image. Click for full size.
By Unknown Source
11. John H. Reagan
October 8, 1818 – March 6, 1905
U.S. Rep. from Tx. 1857-1861
C.S.A. Post Master Gen. 1861-1865
C.S.A. Sec. of the Treasury 1865
U.S. Rep. from Tx. 1875-1887
U.S. Sen. from Tx. 1887-1891
P. green led the fund-raising efforts of the Abbeville Civic Club for this marker. They unveiled it on Thursday afternoon, October 6, 1921. All Abbeville business were closed for the day and hundred of citizens filled the intersection of Main and Greenville Streets. Confederate veterans occupied seats directly in front of the speakers' stand, and Hatch's Band provided excellent music. J. Rion McKissik, editor of the Greenville News spoke. Standing on the portico of the Baptist Church, "he delivered a profound address dealing with the historical events surrounding the last days of the Confederacy." Mrs. Foster B. McLune, president of the Civil Club, then presented the marker to Mayor Moore Mars for the city of Abbeville. The mayor accepted it with a "graceful speech" as a "vast crowd of natives and visitors" looked on. The eight-foot granite marker rests on a granite slab just south of the famous Burt-Stark House on a small plot donated to the city by J.S. Stark, then owner of the house. (Source: A Guide to Confederate Monuments in South Carolina: "Passing the Silent Cup" by Robert S. Seigler (1997) pgs. 29-30.)
    — Submitted February 4, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. Jefferson Davis (1808–1889)
Jefferson Davis, (son-in-law of President
William Campbell Preston Breckinridge<br>August 28, 1837 - November 18, 1904 image. Click for full size.
The Breckinridges of Kentucky by James C. Klotter (1986)
12. William Campbell Preston Breckinridge
August 28, 1837 - November 18, 1904
U.S. Rep. from Ken. 1885-1895
Zachary Taylor), a Representative and a Senator from Mississippi; born in what is now Fairview, Todd County, Ky., June 3, 1808; moved with his parents to a plantation near Woodville, Wilkinson County, Miss.; attended the country schools, St. Thomas College, Washington County, Ky., Jefferson College, Adams County, Miss., Wilkinson County Academy, and Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky.; graduated from the United States Military Academy, West Point, N.Y., in 1828; served in the Black Hawk War in 1832; promoted to the rank of first lieutenant in the First Dragoons in 1833, and served until 1835, when he resigned; moved to his plantation, ‘Brierfield,’ in Warren County, Miss., and engaged in cotton planting; elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-ninth Congress and served from March 4, 1845, until June 1846, when he resigned to command the First Regiment of Mississippi Riflemen in the war with Mexico; appointed to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Jesse Speight; subsequently elected and served from August 10, 1847, until September 23, 1851, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Military Affairs (Thirtieth through Thirty-second Congresses); unsuccessful candidate for Governor in 1851; appointed Secretary of War by President Franklin Pierce 1853-1857; again elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1857, until January
George Gibbs Dibrell<br>April 12, 1822 – May 9, 1888 image. Click for full size.
By Matthew Brady
13. George Gibbs Dibrell
April 12, 1822 – May 9, 1888
Tenn. House of Rep. 1861
U.S. Rep. from Tenn. 1875-1885
21, 1861, when he withdrew with other secessionist Senators; chairman, Committee on Military Affairs and the Militia (Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses); commissioned major general of the State militia in January 1861; chosen President of the Confederacy by the Provisional Congress and inaugurated in Montgomery, Ala., February 18, 1861; elected President of the Confederacy for a term of six years and inaugurated in Richmond, Va., February 22, 1862; captured by Union troops in Irwinsville, Ga., May 10, 1865; imprisoned in Fortress Monroe, indicted for treason, and was paroled in the custody of the court in 1867; returned to Mississippi and spent the remaining years of his life writing; died in New Orleans, La., on December 6, 1889; interment in Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, La.; reinterment on May 31, 1893, in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Va.; the legal disabilities placed upon him were removed, and he was posthumously restored to the full rights of citizenship, effective December 25, 1868, pursuant to a Joint Resolution of Congress (Public Law 95-466), approved October 17, 1978. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted November 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

4. John Cabell Breckinridge (1822-1875)
John Cabell Breckinridge,
Basil W. Duke<br>May 28, 1838 – September 16, 1916 image. Click for full size.
U.S. Library of Congress
14. Basil W. Duke
May 28, 1838 – September 16, 1916
(grandson of John Breckinridge, father of Clifton Rodes Breckinridge, and cousin of Henry Donnel Foster), a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and a Vice President of the United States; born at ‘Cabell’s Dale,’ near Lexington, Ky., January 16, 1821; attended Pisgah Academy, Woodford County, Ky.; graduated from Centre College, Danville, Ky., in 1839; later attended the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University); studied law in the Transylvania Institute, Lexington, Ky.; admitted to the bar in 1840; moved to Burlington, Iowa, but soon returned and began practice in Lexington, Ky.; major of the Third Kentucky Volunteers during the Mexican War in 1847 and 1848; member, State house of representatives 1849; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-second and Thirty-third Congresses (March 4, 1851-March 3, 1855); was not a candidate for renomination in 1854; was tendered the mission to Spain by President Franklin Pierce, but declined; elected Vice President of the United States in 1856 on the Democratic ticket with James Buchanan as President; unsuccessful candidate for President in 1860; elected to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1861, until expelled by resolution of December 4, 1861, for support of the rebellion; entered the Confederate Army during the Civil War as brigadier general and soon became a major general; Secretary of War in the Cabinet of the Confederate
Samuel Wragg Ferguson<br>November 3, 1834 – February 3, 1917 image. Click for full size.
By Unknown Source
15. Samuel Wragg Ferguson
November 3, 1834 – February 3, 1917
States from January until April 1865; resided in Europe until 1868; returned to Lexington, Ky., and resumed the practice of law; vice president of the Elizabethtown, Lexington Big Sandy Railroad Co.; died in Lexington, Ky., May 17, 1875; interment in Lexington Cemetery. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted November 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

5. John Henninger Reagan (1818-1905)
John Henninger Reagan, a Representative and a Senator from Texas; born in Sevierville, Sevier County, Tenn., October 8, 1818; attended the common schools and private academies; moved to Texas in 1839, joined the republic’s army, and participated in campaigns against the Cherokee Indians; deputy State surveyor of the public lands 1839-1843; studied law; admitted to the bar in 1848 and practiced in Buffalo and Palestine, Tex.; member, State house of representatives 1847-1849; judge of the district court 1852-1857, when he resigned; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses (March 4, 1857-March 3, 1861); elected to the secession convention of Texas in 1861; deputy to the Provisional Congress of the Confederacy; postmaster general of the Confederacy from 1861 until the close of the war; also appointed Acting Secretary of
John Crawford Vanghn<br>1824-1875 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
16. John Crawford Vanghn
1824-1875
the Treasury of the Confederacy for a short time preceding the close of the war; imprisoned at Fort Warren for several months after the war; member of the State constitutional convention in 1875; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-fourth and to the five succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1875-March 3, 1887); had been reelected to the Fiftieth Congress but resigned March 4, 1887, to become Senator; chairman, Committee on Commerce (Forty-fifth, Forty-sixth, Forty-eighth, and Forty-ninth Congresses); elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1887, until June 10, 1891, when he resigned; returned to Texas and was appointed a member of the railroad commission of the State and served as chairman 1897-1903; died in Palestine, Anderson County, Tex., March 6, 1905; interment in East Hill Cemetery. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted November 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

6. William Campbell Preston Breckinridge (1837–1904)
William Campbell Preston Breckinridge, (grandson of John Breckinridge, uncle of Levin Irving Handy, and great-uncle of John Bayne Breckinridge), a Representative from Kentucky; born in Baltimore, Md., August 28, 1837; attended the common schools, Jefferson College, Chambersburg,
Braxton Bragg<br>March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876 image. Click for full size.
U.S. Library of Congress
17. Braxton Bragg
March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876
Pa., and Pisgah Academy, Woodford County, Ky.; was graduated from Centre College, Danville, Ky., in 1855 and from the law department of the University of Louisville in 1857; was admitted to the bar in 1857 and commenced practice in Lexington, Ky.; entered the Confederate Army in 1861 as captain and was subsequently promoted to the rank of colonel in the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry; was in command of the Kentucky cavalry designated to act as bodyguard for President Jefferson Davis and the members of his cabinet at the close of the Civil War; returned to Lexington, Ky., and was attorney for Fayette County; edited the Lexington (Ky.) Observer and Reporter 1866-1868; professor of equity and jurisprudence in the University of Kentucky at Lexington; delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in 1876 and 1888; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-ninth and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1885-March 3, 1895); unsuccessful candidate for election in 1896 to the Fifty-fifth Congress; resumed the practice of law and also edited the Lexington Herald; died in Lexington, Ky., November 18, 1904; interment in Lexington Cemetery. (Source: Biograpical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted November 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

7. George Gibbs Dibrell
George
Federal 3-inch Ordnance Rifle image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 27, 2008
18. Federal 3-inch Ordnance Rifle
This Civil War era gun, produced by Phoenix Iron Works of Pennsylvania, was delivered in 1864.
Gibbs Dibrell, a Representative from Tennessee; born in Sparta, White County, Tenn., April 12, 1822; attended the public schools, and was graduated from the East Tennessee University, Knoxville, Tenn., in 1843; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1843 and practiced; engaged in agricultural and mercantile pursuits; justice of the peace and county court clerk of White County, Tenn., for many years; member, State house of representatives, 1861; volunteered in the Confederate Army and served from 1861 to 1865; rose from private to lieutenant colonel of Infantry and colonel of Cavalry, and was discharged as brigadier general; delegate to the State’s constitutional convention in 1870; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-fourth and to the four succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1875-March 3, 1885); was not a candidate for renomination in 1884; resumed agricultural and mercantile pursuits; died in Sparta, Tenn., May 9, 1888; interment in the Old Sparta Cemetery. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted November 14, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. GovernmentMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
 
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