“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)

Silas Green

Silas Green Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 26, 2014
1. Silas Green Marker
Inscription. Silas Green was born into slavery around the year 1845 on a plantation in Franklin County, Virginia. According to local legend, soon after the beginning of the Civil War, Green voluntarily enrolled in the Confederate army. His owner considered him too valuable to sacrifice to war and refused to let him enter the service. Green was determined to join the army, and in spite of his owner's wishes, he organized and trained his own company of soldiers. He was ultimately forced, however, to watch his men go off to battle while he stayed on the farm to work. Records show that Green applied for a government pension for service in the Civil War in 1926, but his request was denied.

After the end of the war, when thousands of freed slaves across the South moved to cities, Green and several members of his family came to Lynchburg. He first worked in a tobacco warehouse in the city, and then as a wagon driver and delivery man. The Green family lived near the intersection of Polk and Sixth Streets for nearly fifty years. Silas Green died in 1937 at the age of 92.

A small obelisk near the Monroe Street fence marks the grave of Silas Green, his wife, his mother-in-law, and his infant daughter.

Campbell Chronicles and Family Sketches, by R. H. Early, page 263.
Silas Green Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 26, 2014
2. Silas Green Marker
37° 24.926′ N, 79° 9.417′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Taylor Street and 4th Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg VA 24501, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lynchburg’s Confederate Surgeons (here, next to this marker); Crippled Corps and VM.I. Cadets Form Inner Defenses in Old City Cemetery (here, next to this marker); Lynchburg, Virginia (here, next to this marker); The Confederate Section (here, next to this marker); Lucy Mina Otey and the Ladie’s Relief Hospital (here, next to this marker); Professor Frank Trigg (within shouting distance of this marker); Court Street Baptist Church Tragedy (within shouting distance of this marker); The Carl Porter Cato Rose Collection (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Lynchburg.
Also see . . .  Old City Cemetery. The oldest public cemetery in Virginia still in use today - central Virginia's most unique public garden. (Submitted on May 28, 2014.) 
Categories. African AmericansCemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 395 times since then and 66 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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