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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Georgetown County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Georgetown

 
 
Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
1. Georgetown Marker
Inscription. Georgetown, the third oldest town in the state, was laid out in 1729 by Elisha Screven on land granted to John and Edward Perrie, Sept. 15, 1705, and deeded by him, Jan. 18, 1734, to George Pawley, William Swinton, and Daniel La Roche, Trustees. It was made a Port of Entry in 1732.
 
Erected 1940 by the City of Georgetown. (Marker Number 22-2 (Q).)
 
Location. 33° 22.095′ N, 79° 16.833′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, South Carolina, in Georgetown County. Marker is on Highmarket Street (U.S. 521) west of Screven Street, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Georgetown SC 29440, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Prince George’s Parish Church, Winyah (within shouting distance of this marker); Prince George Winyah Church (within shouting distance of this marker); William Doyle Morgan House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Georgetown County Courthouse (about 600 feet away); Beth Elohim Cemetery (about 700 feet away); Bethel Church (about 700 feet away);
Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, January 20, 2008
2. Georgetown Marker
Elisha Screven / William Screven (about 700 feet away but has been reported missing); Screven Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Also see . . .  Georgetown and Georgetown County, South Carolina, History. “By 1729, Georgetown was a busy seaport, with cargo ever flowing down-river on barges and flats. Imports and exports created wealth beyond imagination. The citizens of the Georgetown District petitioned the King of England to have a port, which was officially granted in 1732 with the arrival of the King's "Collector of Customs". The slow and heavily ladened merchant ships were easy pickings for pirates, who darted out from the labyrinth of hidden bays in the barrier islands to plunder without respect for life. Some of the most famous pirates in history lurked offshore.... ‘Blackbeard,’ ‘Caesar,’ and ‘Red Anny,’ to name a few.” (Submitted on April 28, 2008.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraPolitical Subdivisions
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 968 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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